Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a generic type, including

List<string>
Nullable<Int32>

how do i get a generic name for C#?

var t = typeof(Nullable<DateTime>);    
var s = t.GetGenericTypeDefinition().Name + "<" + t.GetGenericArguments()[0].Name + ">";

This yields

"Nullable`1<DateTime>"

, but i need

"Nullable<DateTime>"

.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 47 down vote accepted

I see you already accepted an answer, but honestly, that answer isn't going to be enough to do this reliably if you just combine what's in there with what you already wrote. It's on the right track, but your code will only work for generic types with exactly one generic parameter, and it will only work when the generic type parameter itself is not generic!

This is a function (written as an extension method) that should actually work in all cases:

public static class TypeExtensions
{
    public static string ToGenericTypeString(this Type t)
    {
        if (!t.IsGenericType)
            return t.Name;
        string genericTypeName = t.GetGenericTypeDefinition().Name;
        genericTypeName = genericTypeName.Substring(0,
            genericTypeName.IndexOf('`'));
        string genericArgs = string.Join(",",
            t.GetGenericArguments()
                .Select(ta => ToGenericTypeString(ta)).ToArray());
        return genericTypeName + "<" + genericArgs + ">";
    }
}

This function is recursive and safe. If you run it on this input:

Console.WriteLine(
    typeof(Dictionary<string, List<Func<string, bool>>>)
    .ToGenericTypeString());

You get this (correct) output:

Dictionary<String,List<Func<String,Boolean>>>
share|improve this answer
1  
It's a pity the CLR does not come with this function. –  Paul Ruane Mar 15 '10 at 17:53
2  
@Paul Ruane: I agree that it could be useful in certain cases, however, the CLR is language-agnostic, and there'd be no way to implement something like this so as to work equally well in C#, VB.NET, F#, IronPython, and all of the other CLR languages. The weird-looking name with the backtick is actually the true CLR type name; the format above is C# specific. –  Aaronaught Mar 15 '10 at 19:00
    
Ah yes, good point. I have tunnel C# vision! –  Paul Ruane Mar 15 '10 at 20:21
10  
There could be at least an helper function in the Microsoft.CSharp namespace. That namespace contains language-specific classes. –  BladeWise Jun 21 '10 at 15:42
    
While this answer is really great, it will not work when dealing with nested classes, or with arrays of generic objects, see my answer for a full solution –  yoel halb Apr 4 '14 at 5:10

While the accepted solution is good for just the name or for a non nested full name (by replacing name to full name as in @Ose E's answer), however for nested types it will still not work, and also not for arrays of generic types.

So here is a solution that will work, (but note that this solution will only set the actual arguments, only if all arguments are set, and in other words even if the declaring type has supplied type arguemts, as long as the innermost generic type has not, it will still not show up even for the base).

    public static string ToGenericTypeString(this Type t, params Type[] arg)
    {
        if (t.IsGenericParameter || t.FullName == null) return t.Name;//Generic argument stub
        bool isGeneric = t.IsGenericType || t.FullName.IndexOf('`') >= 0;//an array of generic types is not considered a generic type although it still have the genetic notation
        bool isArray = !t.IsGenericType && t.FullName.IndexOf('`') >= 0;
        Type genericType = t;
        while (genericType.IsNested && genericType.DeclaringType.GetGenericArguments().Count()==t.GetGenericArguments().Count())//Non generic class in a generic class is also considered in Type as being generic
        {
            genericType = genericType.DeclaringType;
        }
        if (!isGeneric) return t.FullName.Replace('+', '.');

        var arguments = arg.Any() ? arg : t.GetGenericArguments();//if arg has any then we are in the recursive part, note that we always must take arguments from t, since only t (the last one) will actually have the constructed type arguments and all others will just contain the generic parameters
        string genericTypeName = genericType.FullName;
        if (genericType.IsNested)
        {
            var argumentsToPass = arguments.Take(genericType.DeclaringType.GetGenericArguments().Count()).ToArray();//Only the innermost will return the actual object and only from the GetGenericArguments directly on the type, not on the on genericDfintion, and only when all parameters including of the innermost are set
            arguments = arguments.Skip(argumentsToPass.Count()).ToArray();
            genericTypeName = genericType.DeclaringType.ToGenericTypeString(argumentsToPass) + "." + genericType.Name;//Recursive
        }
        if (isArray)
        {
            genericTypeName = t.GetElementType().ToGenericTypeString() + "[]";//this should work even for multidimensional arrays
        }
        if (genericTypeName.IndexOf('`') >= 0)
        {
            genericTypeName = genericTypeName.Substring(0, genericTypeName.IndexOf('`'));
            string genericArgs = string.Join(",", arguments.Select(a => a.ToGenericTypeString()).ToArray());
                //Recursive
            genericTypeName = genericTypeName + "<" + genericArgs + ">";
            if (isArray) genericTypeName += "[]";
        }
        if (t != genericType)
        {
            genericTypeName += t.FullName.Replace(genericType.FullName, "").Replace('+','.');
        }
        if (genericTypeName.IndexOf("[") >= 0 && genericTypeName.IndexOf("]") != genericTypeName.IndexOf("[") +1) genericTypeName = genericTypeName.Substring(0, genericTypeName.IndexOf("["));//For a non generic class nested in a generic class we will still have the type parameters at the end 
        return genericTypeName;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Used this solution on a project I am working on, works great –  Oren Sep 23 '14 at 10:02

Minor addition to @Aaronaught

public string ToGenericTypeString(Type t)
{
    if (!t.IsGenericType)
        return t.FullName;
    string genericTypeName = t.GetGenericTypeDefinition().FullName;
    genericTypeName = genericTypeName.Substring(0,
        genericTypeName.IndexOf('`'));
    string genericArgs = string.Join(",",
        t.GetGenericArguments()
            .Select(ta => ToGenericTypeString(ta)).ToArray());
    return genericTypeName + "<" + genericArgs + ">";
}
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like the only thing you've changed is from Name to FullName? I'm not sure if that's materially changing enough to justify an alternative answer - it should probably have been posted as a comment. –  Aaronaught Feb 26 '14 at 16:32
    
It is not an alternative. Fullname helps with namespace resolution. –  Osa E Feb 26 '14 at 19:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.