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When i try to compile this:

public static Rand searchCount (int[] x) 
{
    int a ; 
    int b ; 

    ...   

    for (int l= 0; l<x.length; l++) 
    {
        if (x[l] == 0) 
        a++ ;
        else if (x[l] == 1) 
        b++ ;
    }

    ...   

}

I get these errors:

Rand.java:72: variable a might not have been initialized
                a++ ;
                ^
Rand.java:74: variable b might not have been initialized
                b++ ;
                ^
2 errors

it seems to me that i initialized them at the top of the method. Whats going wrong?

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+1 for getting so many duplicate answers so quickly :) –  Robin Day Mar 15 '10 at 16:48

10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You declared them, but you didn't initialize them. Initializing them is setting them equal to a value:

int a;        // This is a declaration
int b = 0;    // This is an initialization

You get the error because you haven't initialized the variables, but you increment them (e.g., a++) in the for loop.

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10  
Perhaps "int b = 0;" is "declaration and initialization." –  Arun Mar 15 '10 at 17:05

local variables do not get default values. their initial values are undefined with out assigning values by some means. before you can use local variables they must be initialized.

there is a big difference when you declare a variable at class level (as a member ie. as a field) and at method level.

if you declare a field at class level they get default values according to their type. if you declare a variable at method level or as a block (means anycode inside {}) do not get any values and remain undefined until some how they get some starting values ie some values assigned to them.

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If they were declared as fields of the class then they would be really initialized with 0.

You're a bit confused because if you write:

class Clazz {
  int a;
  int b;

  Clazz () {
     super ();
     b = 0;
  }

  public void printA () {
     sout (a + b);
  }

  public static void main (String[] args) {
     new Clazz ().printA ();
  }
}

Then this code will print "0". It's because a special constructor will be called when you create new instance of Clazz. At first super () will be called, then field a will be initialized implicitly, and then line b = 0 will be executed.

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You declared them, but didn't initialize them with a value. Add something like this :

int a = 0;
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int a = 0;
int b = 0;
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You haven't initialised a and b, only declared them. There is a subtle difference.

int a = 0;
int b = 0;

At least this is for C++, I presume Java is the same concept.

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yes java is the same (i think) –  David Mar 15 '10 at 18:05

You declared them at the start of the method, but you never initialized them. Initializing would be setting them equal to a value, such as:

int a = 0;
int b = 0;
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You declared them, but not initialized.

int a; // declaration, unknown value
a = 0; // initialization
int a = 0; // declaration with initialization
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You declared them but did not provide them with an intial value - thus, they're unintialized. Try something like:

public static Rand searchCount (int[] x)  
{ 
  int a = 0 ;  
  int b = 0 ; 

and the warnings should go away.

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Imagine what happens if x[l] is neither 0 nor 1 in the loop. In that case a and b will never be assigned to and have an undefined value. You must initialize them both with some value, for example 0.

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