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I'm mapping a set of tables that share a common set of fields:

alt text

So as you can see I'm using a table-per-concrete-type strategy to map the inheritance.

But...

I have not could to relate them to an abstract type containing these common properties.

It's possible to do it using EF?


BONUS: The only non documented Entity Data Model Mapping Scenario is Table-per-concrete-type inheritance http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc716779.aspx : P

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Finally I created an interface 'Iggy' that contained the accessors to the common properties:

public Interface Iggy
{
  string modifiedBy { get; set; }
  DateTime modifiedDate { get; set; }
}

and used partial classes to implement it in the domain classes

public partial class Al:Iggy{}
public partial class Ben:Iggy{}
public partial class Carl:Iggy{}

C# is really very handy, and although I would liked to do it using a entity-framework feature, partials work like a charm : )

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Why not fix the table design?!

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Hi Reinier! thanks for your suggestion : ). but actually it would result very expensive (there are ~150 tables in the project) so I would consider it in the next iteration. right now we prefer to implement it this way, avoiding a huge-uber-refactor. also there are many tradeoffs between strategies, this one is good at perfomance (avoid lots of joins against a central table). thanks again :). –  SDReyes Mar 15 '10 at 17:07
    
BTW I'm supposing you are talking about a Table-per-type inheritance strategy. (offtopic) : ) –  SDReyes Mar 15 '10 at 23:16
1  
Sure, you do save on joins. But I don't know how to help you, sorry. –  reinierpost Mar 16 '10 at 23:23
    
Yeah, we save many joins :) –  SDReyes Jun 19 '13 at 16:15

I have achieved this exact scenario today. The designer does not seem to do it properly, but here is how I did it by modifying the EDMX: -

  1. In the base class, put all your shared properties e.g modified date and modified by. You can do this in the CSDL section. Do not put any conditions on the CSDL.
  2. In the C-S mapping content, put the mappings of your fields in. Obviously you need to map on both child entities the shared properties to the physical DB columns.
  3. Put a condition on each table where the PK column e.g. Id sets IsNull=false.

If you then reopen the designer, you should see that the shared fields are in the base class, and the only fields that appear on the derived types (in the Column Mappings area) will be the unique columns.

At least, this worked for me :-)

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Actually, using partial classes to implement the interface really does solve your problem if you have just a few tables (entities) that you want to map.But when you need to do this with more entities or with even more interfaces, you could use the T4 template used by EF to generate the classes, and then implement the interface directly at the POCO auto-generated classes,with no need of manual work.

I have done this myself, we have created a ISimpleAuditable interface, very similar to yours, and the T4 checks if the table has the correct fields, and if it does, it will add the interface implementation code to the class.

We have created a Include.tt file that has code like this:

public static string GetTypeInterfaces(EntityType entity) { string interfaces = String.Empty;

    if(IsNome(entity))
    {
        if(IsIdentifiableNumeric(entity))
            interfaces = "IEntity<int>";

        if(IsIdentifiableText(entity))
            interfaces = "IEntity<string>";

        if (interfaces == String.Empty)
            interfaces = "INome";

        if(IsSimpleAuditable(entity))
            if (interfaces==String.Empty) 
                interfaces = "ISimpleAuditable<string>";
            else
                interfaces += ", ISimpleAuditable<string>";
    }
    else
    {
        if(IsIdentifiableNumeric(entity))
            interfaces = "IIdentifiable<int>";

        if(IsIdentifiableText(entity))
            interfaces = "IIdentifiable<string>";

        if(IsSimpleAuditable(entity))
            if (interfaces==String.Empty) 
                interfaces = "ISimpleAuditable<string>";
            else
                interfaces += ", ISimpleAuditable<string>";
    }
    if (interfaces != string.Empty)
        if (entity.BaseType !=null)
            interfaces = string.Format(", {0}", interfaces); 
        else
            interfaces = string.Format(": {0}", interfaces); 

    return interfaces;
}

The T4 code looks something like this:

<#@ template language="C#" debug="true" hostspecific="true"#> 
<#@ import namespace="System.Diagnostics" #>
<#@ include file="EF.Utility.CS.ttinclude"#>
<#@ include file="Winsys.Sandstone.Data.ttinclude"#><#@ 
 output extension=".cs"#><#

const string inputFile = @"Winsys.Sandstone.Data.edmx";
var textTransform = DynamicTextTransformation.Create(this);
var code = new CodeGenerationTools(this);
    var ef = new MetadataTools(this);
var typeMapper = new TypeMapper(code, ef, textTransform.Errors);
var fileManager = EntityFrameworkTemplateFileManager.Create(this);
var itemCollection = new EdmMetadataLoader(textTransform.Host, TextTransform.Errors).CreateEdmItemCollection(inputFile);
var codeStringGenerator = new CodeStringGenerator(code, typeMapper, ef);

if     (!typeMapper.VerifyCaseInsensitiveTypeUniqueness(typeMapper.GetAllGlobalItems(itemCollection), inputFile))
{
return string.Empty;
}

WriteHeader(codeStringGenerator, fileManager);

foreach (var entity in typeMapper.GetItemsToGenerate<EntityType>(itemCollection))
{
fileManager.StartNewFile(entity.Name + ".cs");
BeginNamespace(code);
#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.UsingDirectives(inHeader: false)#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.EntityClassOpening(entity)#>
{
<#
    var propertiesWithDefaultValues =     typeMapper.GetPropertiesWithDefaultValues(entity);
    var collectionNavigationProperties = typeMapper.GetCollectionNavigationProperties(entity);
    var complexProperties = typeMapper.GetComplexProperties(entity);

    if (propertiesWithDefaultValues.Any() || collectionNavigationProperties.Any() || complexProperties.Any())
    {
#>
    public <#=code.Escape(entity)#>()
    {
<#
        foreach (var edmProperty in propertiesWithDefaultValues)
        {
#>
        this.<#=code.Escape(edmProperty)#> =         <#=typeMapper.CreateLiteral(edmProperty.DefaultValue)#>;
<#
        }

        foreach (var navigationProperty in collectionNavigationProperties)
        {
#>
        this.<#=code.Escape(navigationProperty)#> = new     List<<#=typeMapper.GetTypeName(navigationProperty.ToEndMember.GetEntityType())#>>();
<#
        }

        foreach (var complexProperty in complexProperties)
        {
#>
        this.<#=code.Escape(complexProperty)#> = new         <#=typeMapper.GetTypeName(complexProperty.TypeUsage)#>();
<#
        }
#>
    }

<#
    }

var simpleProperties = typeMapper.GetSimpleProperties(entity);
if (simpleProperties.Any())
{
    foreach (var edmProperty in simpleProperties)
    {
#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.Property(edmProperty)#>
<#
    }
}

if (complexProperties.Any())
{
#>

<#
    foreach(var complexProperty in complexProperties)
    {
#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.Property(complexProperty)#>
<#
    }
}

var navigationProperties = typeMapper.GetNavigationProperties(entity);
if (navigationProperties.Any())
{
#>
<#=WinsysGenerator.GetSimpleAuditable(entity)#>
<#
    foreach (var navigationProperty in navigationProperties)
    {
#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.NavigationProperty(navigationProperty)#>
<#
    }
}
#>

Note that this is not the full T4, but you can get the idea

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