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I have code resembling this:

class FirstClass
{
    public $postProcessor;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->postProcessor = function ($x) {return $x;};
    }

    public function get()
    {
        $number = 2 // I want this line to not run when doing unit tests
                    // (It sends an HTTP request in the actual code)
        $this->postProcessor($number);
        // This above line will most likely not work, I had to resort to all
        // sorts of hack to get the function to be actually called.
    }
}

class SecondClass
{
    public function firstMethod()
    {
        $instance = new FirstClass();
        $instance->postProcessor = function ($x) {return $x * 2;};
        return $instance->get();
    }

    public function secondMethod()
    {
        $instance = new FirstClass();
        $instance->postProcessor = function ($x) {return $x / 2;};
        return $instance->get();
    }
}

So, I'd like to be able to test if those anonymous functions work correctly, without running the line that I placed that comment in.

In case I can't use anonymous functions to do this (or if it's too impractical): is it preferable to define all those postprocessors as methods of a class over just defining them as a bunch of functions? If so, why?

share|improve this question
    
From the looks of it, that anonymous function could easily be refactored into a regular class method. And/or, you can call that function just like a class method and test it the same way as any other class method...!? –  deceze Jun 30 at 11:17
    
@deceze That is correct. I would have preferred to keep all code that is relevant to firstMethod in the same place for the sake of simplicity, so I'd like to know if this is possible in any way. –  Underyx Jun 30 at 11:19
    
possible duplicate of PHPUnit testing with closures –  Schleis Jun 30 at 17:16

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