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Is there a way to get a get/set behaviour on an array? I imagine something like this:

var arr = ['one', 'two', 'three'];   
var _arr = new Array();

for (var i=0; i < arr.length; i++) {
arr[i].__defineGetter__('value',
function(index) {
    //Do something
    return _arr[index];
});
arr[i].__defineSetter__('value',
function(index, val) {
    //Do something
    _arr[index] = val;
});
};
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17  
@Spudley Please don't perpetuate the myth that JS is not OO. It most definitely is. Claiming the opposite reveals poor understanding of OO, JS or both. –  KaptajnKold Mar 17 '11 at 13:10
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Array access is no different to normal property access. array[0] means array['0'], so you can define a property with name '0' and intercept access to the first array item through that.

However, that does make it impractical for all but short, more-or-less-fixed-length Arrays. You can't define a property for “all names that happen to be integers” all in one go.

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3  
Interesting strategy. I'm still waiting for JavaScript to introduce a catch-all getter/setter mechanism and I will be a happy duck! –  chaiguy Feb 7 '12 at 16:28
    
Worth mentioning that being an Array key is defined in the specification as being able to convert they keys to a unsigned 32 bit integer. Nice answer. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 7 '13 at 18:55
    
I implemented @bobince's suggestion here. It works well for everything except if the array is accessed outside the established array limits. –  Constablebrew Oct 10 '13 at 16:03
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You can add whatever methods you like to an Array, by adding them to Array.proptotype. Here's an example that adds a getter and setter

Array.prototype.get = function(index) {
  return this[index];
}

Array.prototype.set = function(index, value) {
  this[index] = value;
}
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Sounds very functional and compatible, but If you wanna tweak an Array for good, than you don't want an Array anymore, but a class as @jpabluz said –  Fabiano PS Mar 15 '10 at 18:01
2  
But what I want is for the array to seemingly operate as before, so I can do arr[0] = "value" and not arr.set() etc.. and still execute some code when that is done. This is the way getter/setters function for normal properties. –  Martin Hansen Mar 15 '10 at 18:56
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I looked up in John Resig's article JavaScript Getters And Setters, but his prototype example didn't work for me. After trying out some alternatives, I found one that seemed to work. You can use Array.prototype.__defineGetter__ in the following way:

Array.prototype.__defineGetter__("sum", function sum(){
var r = 0, a = this, i = a.length - 1;
do {
    r += a[i];
    i -= 1;
} while (i >= 0);
return r;
});
var asdf = [1, 2, 3, 4];
asdf.sum; //returns 10

Worked for me in Chrome and Firefox.

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Why not create a new class for the inner objects?

var a = new Car();

function Car()
{
   // here create the setters or getters necessary
}

And then,

arr = new Array[a, new Car()]

I think you get the idea.

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1  
new Array[ ... ] is not syntactically correct. You have to use parens for instead: new Array( ... ). Or just leave out the new Array and just use the ` [ ... ]` literal notation. –  Šime Vidas Oct 25 '10 at 16:20
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I hope it helps.

Object.extend(Array.prototype, {
    _each: function(iterator) {
                    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
                    iterator(this[i]);
                },
    clear: function() {
                    this.length = 0;
                    return this;
                },
    first: function() {
                    return this[0];
                },
    last: function() {
                return this[this.length - 1];
                },
    compact: function() {
        return this.select(function(value) {
                                                return value != undefined || value != null;
                                                }
                                            );
        },
    flatten: function() {
            return this.inject([], function(array, value) {
                    return array.concat(value.constructor == Array ?
                        value.flatten() : [value]);
                    }
            );
        },
    without: function() {
        var values = $A(arguments);
                return this.select(function(value) {
                        return !values.include(value);
                }
            );
    },
    indexOf: function(object) {
        for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
        if (this[i] == object) return i;
        return -1;
    },
    reverse: function(inline) {
            return (inline !== false ? this : this.toArray())._reverse();
        },
    shift: function() {
        var result = this[0];
        for (var i = 0; i < this.length - 1; i++)
        this[i] = this[i + 1];
        this.length--;
        return result;
    },
    inspect: function() {
            return '[' + this.map(Object.inspect).join(', ') + ']';
        }
    }
);
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Please explain your code. –  hims056 Dec 15 '12 at 4:38
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It is possible to create setters for each element of an array, but there is one limitation: you would not be able to directly set array elements for indexes that are outside the initialized region (e.g. myArray[2] = ... // wouldn't work if myArray.length < 2) Using the Array.prototype functions will work. (e.g. push, pop, splice, shift, unshift.) I give an example of how to accomplish this here.

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