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In Java what is the syntax for commenting out multiple lines?

I want to do something like:

(comment)
LINES I WANT COMMENTED
LINES I WANT COMMENTED
LINES I WANT COMMENTED
(/comment)
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5  
Probably stackoverflow is even faster than google :), google is so 2009. –  Andrei Ciobanu Mar 15 '10 at 19:09
6  
+1 There's no community of developers moderating Google links. And you can learn so much more than just what you asked when you come to StackOverflow. –  Grundlefleck Mar 15 '10 at 19:34
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7 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted
/* 
LINES I WANT COMMENTED 
LINES I WANT COMMENTED 
LINES I WANT COMMENTED 
*/
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/* Lines to be commented */

NB: multiline comments like this DO NOT NEST. This can be the source of errors. It is generally better to just comment every line with //. Most IDEs allow you to do this quite simply.

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1  
..which is to be done with Ctrl+/ in Eclipse. To uncomment, hit it once again. You dan do it for multiple selected lines. –  BalusC Mar 15 '10 at 18:31
    
@BalusC - same in netbeans –  kgrad Mar 15 '10 at 18:40
    
Good to know. I don't use it, so I didn't mention about it :) –  BalusC Mar 15 '10 at 18:59
    
This is a better answer, the accepted answer does not handle nesting of /* */ comments –  Steve Townsend May 25 '11 at 15:40
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As @kgrad says, /* */ does not nest and can cause errors. A better answer is:

// LINE *of code* I WANT COMMENTED 
// LINE *of code* I WANT COMMENTED 
// LINE *of code* I WANT COMMENTED 

Most IDEs have a single keyboard command for doing/undoing this, so there's really no reason to use the other style any more. For example: in eclipse, select the block of text and hit Ctrl+/
To undo that type of comment, use Ctrl+\

UPDATE: The Sun coding convention says that this style should not be used for block text comments:

// Using the slash-slash
// style of comment as shown
// in this paragraph of non-code text is 
// against the coding convention.

but // can be used 3 other ways:

  1. A single line comment
  2. A comment at the end of a line of code
  3. Commenting out a block of code
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/*
 *STUFF HERE
 */

or you can use // on every line.

Below is what is called a JavaDoc comment which allows you to use certain tags (@return, @param, etc...) for documentation purposes.

   /**
    *COMMENTED OUT STUFF HERE
    *AND HERE
    */

More information on comments and conventions can be found here.

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That is a JavaDoc entry, not a comment. –  rodrigoap Mar 15 '10 at 18:02
    
yea did on accident and was fixing while you commented –  CheesePls Mar 15 '10 at 18:03
1  
and it still is –  David Mar 15 '10 at 18:03
    
The first is a JavaDoc comment yes, the second is a simple block comment. ~fixing again so no one gets confused~ –  CheesePls Mar 15 '10 at 18:06
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You could use /* begin comment and end it with */

Or you can simply use // across each line (not recommended)

/*
Here is an article you could of read that tells you all about how to comment
on multiple lines too!:

[http://java.sun.com/docs/codeconv/html/CodeConventions.doc4.html][1]
*/
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With /**/:

/*
stuff to comment
*/
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  • The simple question to your answer is already answered a lot of times:

    /*
    LINES I WANT COMMENTED
    LINES I WANT COMMENTED
    LINES I WANT COMMENTED
    */

  • From your question it sounds like you want to comment out a lot of code?? I would advise to use a repository(git/github) to manage your files instead of commenting out lines.

  • My last advice would be to learn about javadoc if not allready familiar because documenting your code is really important.
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