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I usually have my structure laid out something like this:

<div id="all">
  <div id="page">
    <div id="header"></div>
    <div id="content"></div>
    <div id="footer"></div>
  </div>
</div>

Where the body will hold a background pattern, "all" will hold a dropshadow for the page going up and down, and "page" may often have a repeating-y background as well.

I have tried variations on using the css height/min-height properties:

html, body {
    height:100%;
    ...
}
#all {
    height:100%; 
    min-height:100%; 
}
#page {
    height:100%; 
    min-height:100%;
    height:auto !important;
}

It seems like if I remove height:auto from "all" then it seems like it works UNTIL you scroll, then after the scroll the background for all dissappears

example

However if I keep the height:auto there then I get the problem of the background for page not working

example

Hopefully someone knows a fix?

share|improve this question
2  
The first example seems just fine to me, with or without scroll (no change). Using FF3.6 Win7. –  Tom Mar 15 '10 at 18:46
    
which browser are you having problems in? the first example seemed to work in all my browsers –  tybro0103 Mar 22 '10 at 16:33
    
The first example is close, but when the text has to scroll, the right and left dropshadow background (#all) disappears at the scroll –  kilrizzy Mar 24 '10 at 14:05
    
I posted an answer... But really, I think the easiest thing for you to do would be to combine the two background images (all, and page) into one image (with a white background in the image) and then get rid of #all, using the new image for #page :P –  Chibu Mar 24 '10 at 15:21

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

Well, here's what I ended up with for the CSS:

html, body {
    height:100%; /* IE6: treaded as min-height*/
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    color: #494949;
    text-align: center;
    background-color: #3f91a7;
    background-image: url(images/bg_body.jpg);
    background-repeat: repeat-x;
    background-position: center top;
    font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    font-size: 12px;
}
#all {
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    height:100%; /* IE6: treaded as min-height*/
    min-height:100%; /* real browsers */
    height:auto !important;
    background-image: url(images/bg_all.png);
    background-repeat: repeat-y;
    background-position: center top;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#page {
    width: 993px;
    padding: 0 0 10000px;
    margin-top: 0px;
    margin-right: auto;
    margin-bottom: -10000px;
    margin-left: auto;
    text-align: left;
    background-color: #FFF;
    background-image: url(images/bg_page.jpg);
    background-position: center top;
    background-repeat: repeat-y;
    height:100%; /* IE6: treaded as min-height*/
    min-height:100%; /* real browsers */
    height:auto !important;
}
#header, #footer {
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 16px;
    padding: 20px;
}
#content {
    padding: 25px;
}

I haven't had a chance to test it in anything other than Firefox, but, hoipefully it will give you a good start.

share|improve this answer
    
Crazy, but it works! –  kilrizzy Mar 25 '10 at 0:58

I would just flip the location of your div#all and div#page...

<div id="page">
  <div id="all">
    <div id="header"></div>
    <div id="content"></div>
    <div id="footer"></div>
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

Although the question was posted some years ago, I ran into the same challenge and found this earlier thread today. Although I reckon there might be more fine solutions by now, I wanted to share the one I found today nevertheless.

Had the same problem, background 1 full screen, adaptive and fully below everything else and another repeating(-y) background number 2 should go on top, but not scroll out of sight because it was set to follow the height of the window which was given to the particular div which holds background 2.

Let's start with the divs I created:

<div id="full_background">
    <img src="images/bkg_main.jpg" alt="" />
    <div id="absolute">Contains background set to repeat-y</div>
    <div id="content">Contains the content</div>
</div>

the css looks like this:

* { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }
html { height: 100%; }
body { height: 100%; }

#full_background { width: 100%; min-height: 100%; position: relative; float: left; }
#full_background>img { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; position: fixed; width: 100%; z-index: 1; display: block; }
#full_background>div { position: relative; z-index: 2; }

#absolute { position: fixed !important; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; background: url("../images/bkg2.png") top left repeat-y; }

#content { width: 290px; margin-left: 20px; padding: 30px; line-height: 1.7em; font-family: 'Lato', sans-serif; position: relative; float: left; }

First off, I added a full screen & resizing background image to my site (using the div full_background and the img tag) using the following solution (very easy css solution which works like a charm in every browser and most older versions down to for example IE7) - http://www.webdeveloper.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-256494.html > see last answer by aj_nsc

Next, using the following jQuery method - http://nicholasbarger.com/2011/08/04/jquery-makes-100-height-so-much-easier/ - I created a div with id = absolute, which is given the same height as the browser window (also on resizing). I placed my repeating(-y) background number 2 in here. Set this div to position:fixed and it will stay put when the div with the content is being scrolled through.

Then below this div you put the div with your content, which freely expands downwards beyond the browser window.

Upon scrolling, the two backgrounds will keep filling the full area of the browser window (vertically as well) at all times and stay put, with the content scrolling up and down over them. This way, upon resizing, you also make sure that both backgrounds keep filling the full background area at all times.

I tested this solution in CH, FF, IE7-9 and Safari and it worked in all of them without any problems whatsoever.

share|improve this answer

Here's what's happening: You've set html & body to have a height of 100%, but that 100% is the height of the viewport, not the document. Since #all's height is set to 100%, it is set to 100% of the parent's height, which happens to be body, which is set at 100% of the height of the viewport. Everything's inheriting the height of the viewport.

The way to fix this problem is actually the same way you would fix clearing floats that have an outer container. All you have to do is put overflow:auto; on #all. You don't even need any height declarations on any other elements, and you may be able to eliminate either the #all or the #page div.

More info here: http://www.sitepoint.com/blogs/2005/02/26/simple-clearing-of-floats/

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea but tried it out with a few variations with no luck: jeffkilroy.com/hosted/layout1/index4.html –  kilrizzy Mar 15 '10 at 19:55
    
Have you tried adding #all { height:100%; } to that index4? That should be all you need. –  Isley Aardvark Mar 15 '10 at 20:48
    
I say that because the min-height:100% on #all won't work, the height of the containing block has to be specified explicitly (i.e. not depending on the viewport or content). –  Isley Aardvark Mar 15 '10 at 21:11
    
Ok, I think I understand the use of the overflow method a little better however this shifts my background once the scrollbar appears since the width is not set and the scrollbar is going on the #all div (jeffkilroy.com/hosted/layout1/index5.html). Is there any remedy to this? –  kilrizzy Mar 17 '10 at 17:54
    
You could try overflow:visible or overflow:hidden, or put position:relative on the parent element of #all. Beyond that, I don't know. –  Isley Aardvark Mar 19 '10 at 5:44

Have you tried:

html,
body {
     margin: 0;
     padding: 0;
     height: 100%;
}
#all {
     min-height: 100%;
}

? Only for IE 6, you should set height: 100%; for #all (because it interprets that basically as min-height (as a result of a bug). As IE6 doesn't understand the min-height attribute, height effectively becomes a replacement for min-height).

If you set height: 100%; for other browsers, they will take it as 100% height of the viewport, not 100% of the page, so scrolling won't work correctly.

My comment on the downvote:

It has become clear, that my answer doesn't solve the whole problem. What we have here, seems to be quite a complex case - at least no one here seems to have found an answer yet? I've even looked into Ingo Chao's excellent (German) book, which comes to the same conclusion: Setting the parent's height won't work, and setting the child's height won't work, if the parent's height wasn't set explicitly, but rather dynamically by the size of the content.

But my answer could still help to restrict the possibilities a little bit - because setting height on #all will most likely not work on any browser except IE 6. If you disagree, please post a comment, because in that case, I'd also like to learn more about this.

share|improve this answer
    
That seemed to fix the "all" div but now the same scroll issue with page background happens regardless of a few combinations I used for the "page" style –  kilrizzy Mar 15 '10 at 19:01
    
I'd say, for the #page, also only use min-height: 100%; –  Chris Lercher Mar 15 '10 at 19:07
    
hmm, have that here: jeffkilroy.com/hosted/layout1/index3.html the height for page doesn't seem to be working without scroll though –  kilrizzy Mar 15 '10 at 19:12
    
Ah, you actually have a bit of a complex case here! A child can't inherit the height of its parent, if the parent's height isn't set explicitly (falls back to auto). You could work around it by setting "position: relative;" on #all, and "position: absolute;" on #page. But that will destroy the centering of #page. Hm, I don't know how you would restore the centering? –  Chris Lercher Mar 15 '10 at 19:26

This worked for me:

#page {
    width: 993px;
    padding: 0px;
    margin-top: 0px;
    margin-right: auto;
    margin-bottom: 0px;
    margin-left: auto;
    text-align: left;
    background-color: #FFF;
    background-image: url(http://jeffkilroy.com/hosted/layout1/images/bg_page.jpg);
    background-position: center top;
    background-repeat: repeat-y;
    /* height:100%;  IE6: treaded as min-height*/
    height: expression(document.body.offsetHeight); /* sets min-height for IE */
    overflow: auto;
    min-height:100%; /* real browsers */
    /* height:auto !important; */
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to do the same as the first example, the page bg works great but the #all bg is lost at the scroll –  kilrizzy Mar 24 '10 at 14:09

Forget 100% on the divs, try moving your background image to the html element and the full height border to the body.

html {
    height:100%;
    background-color: blue;
}
body {
    margin: auto auto;
    padding: 0;
    color: #494949;
    /*min-height: 100%; */
    height:100%; /*for ie6*/
    border-left:solid 2px red;
    border-right:solid 2px red;
    background-color:#fff;
    width: 960px;
}
share|improve this answer

Have you tried this :

function getWindowHeight() {
                var windowHeight = 0;
                if (typeof(window.innerHeight) == 'number') {
                    windowHeight = window.innerHeight;
                }
                else {
                    if (document.documentElement && document.documentElement.clientHeight) {
                        windowHeight = document.documentElement.clientHeight;
                    }
                    else {
                        if (document.body && document.body.clientHeight) {
                            windowHeight = document.body.clientHeight;
                        }
                    }
                }
                return windowHeight;
            }


window.onload = init;



 function init(){
 document.getElementByID("all").style.height = getWindowHeight() + "px";

    }   

Or put page instead of all

share|improve this answer
    
why the down vote? –  ant Mar 22 '10 at 18:56
    
Didn't downvote, but I'm guessing it's because you're using javascript to solve a CSS problem. –  peirix Mar 24 '10 at 15:27
    
@peirix well I agree that CSS is the best solution for layouts, but sometimes it isn't powerful enough, especially if you are customizing someone else s work, this helped me so I thought sharing it would be nice .. I gues some people don't like it, I'm really anxious to see the "real" solution –  ant Mar 24 '10 at 15:34

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