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I want to create global cs file for all my test projects to keep all my constants and functions. For example this file for different tests global.cs:

namespace SeleniumTests
{ 
    Public class forAllTests
    {
        //....
        public void Login()
        { 
            wait.Until<IWebElement>((d) => { return d.FindElement(By.Id("login")); });
            driver.FindElement(By.Id("login")).SendKeys("login");
            wait.Until<IWebElement>((d) => { return d.FindElement(By.Id("password")); });
            driver.FindElement(By.Id("password")).SendKeys("password");
        }
    }
}

And for example another file Program.cs

namespace SeleniumTests
{ 
    Public class Test
    { 
        forAllTests.Login();
        //.....
    }
}

Its possible or not?

UPD.

Thanks for answers. Yes, I want more specific advice. I am making tests for Firefox, Chrome and Safari. I know about page objects pattern and i am using it. For example some code from me. Soo some code here(parts 3* 4* - does not works and want to make them correct, please help me). How its works now: 1* Program.cs --

       using System;
        using System.Web;
        using System.Text;
        using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
        using System.Threading;
        using NUnit.Framework;
        using OpenQA.Selenium;
        using OpenQA.Selenium.Chrome;
        using OpenQA.Selenium.Safari;
        using OpenQA.Selenium.Firefox;
        using OpenQA.Selenium.Support.UI;
        using OpenQA.Selenium.Support.PageObjects;
        using System.Diagnostics;
        using System.Threading;
        using Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel;
        using Excel = Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel;
        using System.Web;
        using System.Linq;
        using System.Windows.Forms;
        using System.IO;
        using System.Windows.Controls;





         namespace SeleniumTests
            {

                [TestFixture]
                public class Auth01
                {

                    private bool acceptNextAlert = true;
                    private LoginPage loginPage;
                    private PatientsPage patientsPage;        
                    private MainViewPage mainViewPage;
                    private EmkPage emkPage;
                    private IWebDriver driver;
                    private StringBuilder verificationErrors;
                    private string baseURL;                      
                    string drop_down_id;
                    string drop_down_text;
                    string url1;
                    string url2;
                    string now1;


                    [SetUp]
                    public void SetupTest()
                    {
                        driver = new FirefoxDriver();
                        driver.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
                        baseURL = "http://....";
                        driver.Navigate().GoToUrl(baseURL + Constants.startUrl);
                        // driver.Manage().Window.Maximize();
                        loginPage = new LoginPage();
                        PageFactory.InitElements(driver, loginPage);
                        verificationErrors = new StringBuilder();

                    }


                     public void login()
                    {
                        WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
                        loginPage.Login.Clear();
                        loginPage.Login.SendKeys("login");
                        loginPage.Password.Clear();
                        loginPage.Password.SendKeys("password");
                        IWebElement myDynamicElement = wait.Until<IWebElement>((d) => { return d.FindElement(By.CssSelector(loginPage.enterbuttonPublic)); });
                        loginPage.EnterButton.Click();
                    }

        public void drop_down()
                    {
                        IWebElement elem = driver.FindElement(By.Id(drop_down_id));           
                        var options = elem.FindElements(By.TagName("option"));
                        string opt;
                        string value;
                        string x;
                        foreach (IWebElement option in options)
                        {

                            opt = option.Text;
                            value = option.GetAttribute("value");
                            if (drop_down_text.Equals(opt))
                            {
                                x = "//select[@id='" + drop_down_id + "']/option[@value='" + value + "']";

                            }
                        } 
                    }



                    [TearDown]
                    public void TeardownTest()
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            driver.Quit();
                        }
                        catch (Exception)
                        {

                        } Assert.AreEqual("", verificationErrors.ToString());
                    }

                    [Test]
                    public void The0Auth01Test()
                    {
                        Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
                        stopWatch.Start();
    login();
                     //.....
    drop_down_id="id";
    drop_down_text = "text";
    drop_down();
    //...
    stopWatch.Stop();
    } 
 static void Main()
        {

            Auth01 Auth01_1 = new Auth01();
            Auth01_1.SetupTest();
            Auth01_1.The0Auth01Test();
        }

2* AllAuth.cs --- // for all tests

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using OpenQA.Selenium;
using OpenQA.Selenium.Firefox;
using OpenQA.Selenium.Chrome;
using OpenQA.Selenium.IE;
using OpenQA.Selenium.Support.UI;
using OpenQA.Selenium.Support.PageObjects;
using System.IO
;


namespace SeleniumTests
{

 public class LoginPage
    {



        private IWebDriver driver;
        const string login = "USERNAME";  
        public string loginPublic = login;
        [FindsBy(How = How.Id, Using = login)]  
        public IWebElement Login { get; set; }
        const string password = "PASSWORD";  
        public string passwordPublic = password;
        [FindsBy(How = How.Id, Using = password)]  
        public IWebElement Password { get; set; }
        const string enterbutton = "button.button-gray"; 
        public string enterbuttonPublic = enterbutton;
        [FindsBy(How = How.CssSelector, Using = enterbutton)]
        public IWebElement EnterButton { get; set; }
        const string notification = "#notification-message";  
        public string notificationPublic = notification;  
         [FindsBy(How = How.CssSelector, Using = notification)]
        public IWebElement Notification { get; set; }
        const string body = "BODY";    
        public string bodyPublic = body;
        [FindsBy(How = How.CssSelector, Using = body)]
        public IWebElement Body { get; set; }

        public LoginPage() { }

        public LoginPage(IWebDriver driver)
        {
            this.driver = driver;


            if (!driver.Url.Contains("http:..."))
            {
                throw new StaleElementReferenceException("This is not the login page");
            }
            PageFactory.InitElements(driver, this);
        }

    }

3* And I dream about:

AllAuth.cs ---

///...
namescpace SeleniumTests 
{
/////.....
public class Fantasy
{
 private IWebDriver driver;
login()
{
//....
}
drop_down()
{
//...
}
}
}

4* Program.cs ---

///...
    namescpace SeleniumTests 
    {
    /////.....
 [Test]
                    public void The0Auth01Test()
                    {
fantasy.login();
fantasy.drop_down();
}
///...
}
share|improve this question
    
This is what the page objects pattern is used for. – Arran Jun 30 '14 at 18:10

Sure it's possible. Selenium is merely and API accessed through the WebDriver.dll to drive a browser. Any coding structure you want to use can easily be used for this. I have done a 7 layer version for a company and have seen many just write it all in 1, 2, or 3 layers.

The question is what is best for your organization. For example...if you utilize a particular UnitTest Framework then your "tests" will all exist in a unit test project and reference your core functions similar to an API layer. I would recommend at the very least to incorporate this, as repeating code for common controls in your application is really poor for maintainability and best practices.

The above is in layers and not files. Unless you only have like 5 total tests it is really impractical and difficult to maintain trying to put everything into one or two files. I would really recommend using common coding standards and practices to go with Selenium tests, just like regular c# code. The below links are for c# since this is tagged as c#.

Naming conventions: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff926074.aspx

Framework Guidelines: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229042.aspx

Standards Guidlelines: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brada/archive/2005/01/26/361363.aspx

Many more if you google it...If you would like more specific advice please add more details to your question, that indicate what your project is, how many tests, specifics of the type of web application and how many different browser types are supported, does it support mobile, database usage, team size, etc...All factor into a good design

UPDATE: It looks like you are on the right path, but you will need to setup your driver and pass it to the functions...or use a public/protected variable that is the same for all. The way you have it now it looks like it is starting a new driver every time you call a separate function/method which of course won't work.

So put your setup at the top of your test file (#3) with a single test method in (#4) to "setup". When (#4) first test is called the setup will instantiate your driver and save it in (#3). Then pass that driver variable into all your functions on (#3->#2) so that they execute on the same driver instance. The actual setup call should be in (#3) but called similar with the fantasy.setup(); from (#4). Similarly when you update your page object you pass the existing driver into it and overwrite the existing page object with the new page object...unless you want to keep a bunch of different pages...watch memory usage. This will allow your methods to not have to worry about the driver handling at all. This will also allow you to kick off multiple test threads and each will maintain their own drivers. Then when you call the fantasy.login(); it will go to that method in (#3) and call the (#2) method and pass the private driver from memory in (#3) to (#2) method for execution purposes.

Please let me know if that isn't clear...

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, awesome answer. I've been dying to find some information on how to lay out my test framework. I just want a bit more clarification to what I should be googling for to get more info. "Selenium Automation Test Framework Design Practices"? – sheeptest Jun 30 '14 at 18:50
1  
Nope, the googling was for c# coding standards, although you might find something. Frankly the range of frameworks is extremely vast. I would recommend giving alot of specifics for your organization/application and then getting suggestions. I custom design it every time...although there is usually at least two layers...1 for tests and one for common functions. You could have a data layer, error layer, map layer, web layer if you want that, results layer for more robust outputs, etc...lots of choices. – mutt Jun 30 '14 at 18:58
    
So, it's worth noting that I've never built.. anything substantial. This is my first venture into non-scripting land. Here's the gist of it: I'm using a Selenium-based framework to Automate native mobile apps (Appium). Right now I have like.. 4 layers? Generic classes to mock the actual UI -- so buttons/labels/webviews -- then I have the custom implementations of each of those classes that comprise a screen or viewcontroller. That layer handles the actions done on the view. The next layer strings actions together and checks if the right thing happens. – sheeptest Jul 1 '14 at 15:26
    
After that I have a TestCase (I'm using Python's unittest) that goes through the action+validation layer and organizes them in the order they need to happen. My biggest issue is that I've never done nor seen a successful implementation of an automation framework like this. I don't know if what I'm doing makes sense or adheres to any best practices. I don't know if I could shoot you an email or two, but I'd love some guidance. My email is in my profile desc. – sheeptest Jul 1 '14 at 15:33
    
Big thanks for answer, but i still have problems with static members. I have add details to my question. – insomnia77 Jul 2 '14 at 17:40

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