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so I am trying to build a classifier and score its performance. This is my code:

def svc(train_data, train_labels, test_data, test_labels):
    from sklearn.svm import SVC
    from sklearn.metrics import accuracy_score
    svc = SVC(kernel='linear')
    svc.fit(train_data, train_labels)
    predicted = svc.predict(test_data)
    actual = test_labels
    score = svc.score(test_data, test_labels)
    print ('svc score')
    print (score)
    print ('svc accuracy')
    print (accuracy_score(predicted, actual))

Now when I run the function svc(X, x, Y, y) with:

X.shape = (1000, 150)    
x.shape = (1000, )   
Y.shape = (200, 150)   
y.shape = (200, )

I get the error:

      6     predicted = svc.predict(test_classed_data)
      7     actual = test_classed_labels
----> 8     score = svc.score(test_classed_data, test_classed_labels)
      9     print ('svc score')
     10     print (score)

local/lib/python3.4/site-packages/sklearn/base.py in score(self, X, y, sample_weight)
    289         """
    290         from .metrics import accuracy_score
--> 291         return accuracy_score(y, self.predict(X), sample_weight=sample_weight)
    292 
    293 

    124     if (y_type not in ["binary", "multiclass", "multilabel-indicator",
    125                        "multilabel-sequences"]):
--> 126         raise ValueError("{0} is not supported".format(y_type))
    127 
    128     if y_type in ["binary", "multiclass"]:

ValueError: continuous is not supported

The thing is my test_labels or y are in the format:

[ 15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  15.5  20.5
  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  20.5  25.5  25.5
  25.5  25.5  25.5  25.5  25.5  25.5  25.5  25.5  25.5  30.5  30.5  30.5
  30.5  30.5  30.5  30.5  30.5  30.5  30.5  30.5  35.5  35.5  35.5  35.5
  35.5  35.5  35.5  35.5  35.5  35.5  35.5... ]

I am really confused as to why the SVC does not recognize these as discrete labels when all the examples I have looked at have similar formats to mine and work fine. Please help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The y in both the fit and score functions should be integers or strings, representing class labels.

E.g. if you have two classes "foo" and 1, you can train an SVM like so:

>>> from sklearn.svm import SVC
>>> clf = SVC()
>>> X = np.random.randn(10, 4)
>>> y = ["foo"] * 5 + [1] * 5
>>> clf.fit(X, y)
SVC(C=1.0, cache_size=200, class_weight=None, coef0=0.0, degree=3, gamma=0.0,
  kernel='rbf', max_iter=-1, probability=False, random_state=None,
  shrinking=True, tol=0.001, verbose=False)

Then test its accuracy with

>>> X_test = np.random.randn(6, 4)
>>> y_test = ["foo", 1] * 3
>>> clf.score(X_test, y_test)
0.5

Floating point values are apparently still accepted by fit, but they shouldn't be, because class labels are not supposed to be real values.

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Ah, I see now. Thanks a lot. Also, would it be possible to cast my float labels into strings and then cast the output back into floats? –  user3712008 Jul 2 '14 at 14:19

From the scikit-learn documentation for SVMs at http://scikit-learn.org/stable/modules/svm.html#classification:

"As other classifiers, SVC, NuSVC and LinearSVC take as input two arrays: an array X of size [n_samples, n_features] holding the training samples, and an array Y of integer values"

Either cast your label arrays to int, or if that is too simple (e.g. 1.6 and 1.8 will be cast to the same value) assign each unique float value an integer class label.

Not sure why the fit and predict methods don't throw an error.

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Unfortunately, that documentation is outdated: the input should be of the same type as the y used in fit. fit accepting floats is a bug. –  larsmans Jul 1 '14 at 14:28
    
Ah, I see that it's updated in the development version of the docs. –  DavidS Jul 1 '14 at 15:09

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