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So I'm trying to emulate a button transition i have seen on a Google page I have tried all kinds of things to make the transition smooth but cannot get it to behave as smooth as its Google counter part. To be specific I want a smooth expansion of #fade_one that fills #button and a smooth fade out. So far I have not been able to achieve this through having simultaneous margin and width transitions, the timing on their respective ease-in and ease-out parameters does not seem to want to move in synchronization. Any help would be greatly appreciated! here is the Google link http://www.google.com/design/spec/animation/responsive-interaction.html#responsive-interaction-surface-response (scroll down to where is says "lift upon touch) and here is my fiddle link http://jsfiddle.net/darth_business/hJchP/2/ Finally here is my code:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="button.css">
</head>

<body>

<div id="button">
<div id="fade_one"></div>
<p id="button_text">Click Me</p>
</div> <!-- button ends -->

#button {
    height: 100px;
    width: 200px;
    background-color: #5677fc;
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
}
#button:hover #fade_one {
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0 0 0 0;
    opacity: 0;
}
#button_text {
    color: #fff;
    font-family: Roboto;
    font-size: 50px;
}
#fade_one {
    position: absolute;
    height: 100px;
    width: 0px;
    margin: 0 0 0 100px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    background-color: #fff;
    -moz-transition: width .5s ease-in-out, opacity 1s ease-in;, margin .25s ease-in-out, opacity 1s ease-in;
}

Lastly I would like to mention that as much as possible I want to stay away from using java if i can, thank you!

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem you're having is fundamentally about CSS positioning. The #fade_one element has absolute positioning. When you give you an element absolute position, it is taken out of the normal flow of the page and positioned relative to its nearest positioned ancestor.

In your case, you want the #fade_one element to be an overlay on top of the #button element. In other words, you want #fade_one to be positioned relative to #button. But in order for an absolute element to be relative to its ancestor, that ancestor needs to also be "positioned". The #button element is NOT positioned here.

So when the hover is triggered, the #fade_one element gets 100% width of its positioned ancestor -- which is not #button. In the fiddle, there is no positioned ancestor, so it takes the width of the body element.

The trick is to give a position to the ancestor element you want to contain the absolutely positioned child. Here, simply giving #button a relative position is enough to change it into the positioned ancestor for #fade_one.

Here's more on positioning:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/position#Absolute_positioning

I also took out margins as they are unnecessary. Try this CSS:

#button {
    height: 100px;
    position: relative;
    width: 200px;
    background-color: #5677fc;
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;

}
#button:hover #fade_one {
    width: 100%;
    opacity: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
}
#button_text {
    color: #fff;
    font-family: Roboto;
    font-size: 50px;
}
#fade_one {
    position: absolute;
    height: 100px;
    width: 0px;
    left: 100px;
    top: 0;
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    background-color: #fff;
       transition: left .5s ease-in-out, width .5s ease-in-out, opacity 1s ease-in, opacity 1s ease-in;
}

Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/hJchP/11/

share|improve this answer
    
Although this is the exact thing I need I wonder if you would indulge me a little further, with the understanding that I have only begun programing seriously within last 6 months. I am interested to know what the difference was between declaring margin vs right and left and further what did the position relative change achieve? Thank you again for you help! – user3791576 Jul 1 '14 at 0:09
    
@user3791576 I took another look and my original explanation missed the mark (even though the CSS worked!). I edited the answer to address the real issue -- CSS positioning. – Josh KG Jul 1 '14 at 15:26

Not as smooth as I would like it but this codepen should help you out. The essential part is to create a psuedo element and then animate it on hover. If you have any questions let me know.

Code

HTML

<div class="button">
    <span>
        Button
    </span>
</div>

CSS (not prefixed)

.button {
    font-family: Helvetica, Arial;
    font-size: 12px;
    text-align: center;
    width: 200px;
    padding: 12px 6px;
    margin: 50px auto;
    background-color: #fff;
    box-shadow: 0 1px 2px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    border-radius: 3px;
    transition: all 0.3s ease;
    cursor: pointer;
    position: relative;
}

.button:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    background: #eee;
    -webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%) scale(0);
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%) scale(0);
    transition: 0.2s;
    border-radius: 3px;
    z-index: 0;
}

.button:hover {
    box-shadow: 0 2px 4px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
}

.button:hover:before {
    -webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%) scale(1);
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%) scale(1);
}

.button span {
    z-index: 1;
    position: relative;
}
share|improve this answer

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