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I'm wondering if anybody can explain to me the dot ruling in nested IF statements in COBOL. Example:

*The first if statement*
 IF SUCCESSFUL-STATUS 
     PERFORM 8300-REPL-LNNTBI00 
        THRU 8300-REPL-LNNTBI00-EXIT 
*The second if statement*
        IF SUCCESSFUL-STATUS 
            DISPLAY 'RECORD ALREADY UPDATED :' WS-INF-REC
        ELSE 
            DISPLAY 'UPDATE ERROR : ' WS-INF-REC ' / ' 
            WS-RETURN-STATUS 
 READ INFILE INTO WS-INF-REC.   

Which if statement does the dot placed after "WS-INF-REC" belong to? The first IF or the second IF-ELSE? I know that in most programming, it should be for the last if statement but just to make sure, is it the same for COBOL?

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2  
You need a full-stop/period to terminate the PROCEDURE DIVISION statement, you need on to terminate a procedure label (paragraph/SECTION name), you need one to terminate a procedure (paragraph/SECTION) and if it is not already, the last thing in your program should be a full-stop/period. The ones which terminate a procedure I put on a separate line of their own, so that they are really clear and obvious (as @piet.t says, otherwise they are not. Then, other than literals, no other full-stops/periods in the PROCEDURE DIVISION. For termination where required, scope terminator. –  Bill Woodger Jul 1 '14 at 10:08
2  
Check out: One misplaced period can ruin your life –  NealB Jul 1 '14 at 13:48
    
@BillWoodger; except the pesky END-EXEC and hard on the eyes mandatory period, always there, distracting, looking suspiciously like a stray. Blarg. :-) –  Brian Tiffin Jul 10 '14 at 10:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The period character "." ends all if statements. Remember that spacing is ignored by the compiler so therefore the READ statement is part of the ELSE of the second IF statement.

Us humans want to see the indentation used logically. And, if it were me, I would make the end-if's be explicit. I tend to have one period per paragraph:

* The first if statement *
     IF SUCCESSFUL-STATUS 
       PERFORM 8300-REPL-LNNTBI00 
         THRU 8300-REPL-LNNTBI00-EXIT 
* The second if statement*
       IF SUCCESSFUL-STATUS 
         DISPLAY 'RECORD ALREADY UPDATED :' WS-INF-REC
       ELSE 
         DISPLAY 'UPDATE ERROR : ' WS-INF-REC ' / ' 
           WS-RETURN-STATUS 
         READ INFILE INTO WS-INF-REC
       END-IF
     END-IF
     .
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From the original indentation, the READ should be unconditional :-) –  Bill Woodger Jul 1 '14 at 22:34
    
I see.. So in the case of my code, the READ statement belongs to the second IF statement. I actually only need this confirmation. Thanks a lot! –  blazaphyrocqua Jul 3 '14 at 10:44
    
@blazaphyrocqua according to the compiler that is so. Guessing from the code (shoddy as it is) I'd say that is not what is expected by the human author. I think you have problems with it if you run with that code, but without seeing more, can't be certain of course :-) –  Bill Woodger Jul 3 '14 at 12:09

AFAIR a period always closes ALL preceding statements - regardless wether they are IF, PERFORM or whatever - so in your case the first IF-statement is closed as well. And since periods are so small and easily overlooked I use the following rule:

Avoid using periods, they are evil!

Only put a period where it is strictly required by the syntax rules and nowhere else. Use explicit scope-terminators like END-IF or END-PERFORM. They make your code more readable and clearly structured while periods tend to generate confusion because of multiple closures and their habit of hiding in plain view.

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1  
This is the correct answer, and even more correct (if that is possible) for saying periods in COBOL are evil! –  NealB Jul 1 '14 at 13:46
2  
I always favored having one '.' on a line by itself just before the exit statement. On the mainframe x all;f '.' all will show you all lines with a '.' on it –  Bruce Martin Jul 1 '14 at 21:49
    
True, period brings you back to the topmost level, ending all IFs, PERFORMs, etc. I only mentioned IFs because that is what the original example was using; I should have mentioned the "full" stop-ness of the period. –  Scott Nelson Jul 8 '14 at 0:26

This is really bad, very archaic Cobol, but how it behaves is like this:

*The first if statement*
IF SUCCESSFUL-STATUS 
    PERFORM 8300-REPL-LNNTBI00 
       THRU 8300-REPL-LNNTBI00-EXIT 
*The second if statement*
    IF SUCCESSFUL-STATUS 
        DISPLAY 'RECORD ALREADY UPDATED :' WS-INF-REC
    ELSE 
        DISPLAY 'UPDATE ERROR : ' WS-INF-REC ' / ' WS-RETURN-STATUS 
        READ INFILE INTO WS-INF-REC
    END-IF ## from period
 END-IF ## from period
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1  
Since the second IF statement is at the same logical level as the PERFORM statement, I would have indented them identically. –  Scott Nelson Jul 1 '14 at 19:05

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