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When I am trying to create an object with self reference in constructor I am getting StackOverflowError.

public class Example1 {
    private int i;
    private Example1 zero;

    public Example1(int i) {
        super();
        if (i > 0) {
            this.i = i;
        } else {
            this.i = this.zero.i;
        }
        this.zero = new Example1(i);
    }

    public int getI() {
        return i;
    }

But when I do with static reference no error occurs.

public class Example2 {
    private int i;
    private static final Example2 ZERO = new Example2(0);

    public Example2() {
        this(ZERO.i);
    }

    public Example2(int i) {
        super();
        this.i = i;
    }

    public int getI() {
        return i;
    }

Since static object will be initialized while loading the class it is working that I am able to understand.

But what is happening during object creation, Can anyone explain in detail?

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Are both the codes same? I guess no. –  Rohit Jain Jul 1 '14 at 8:53
3  
Example2(int) does not call it self where as Example1(int) keeps on calling itself, endlessly –  MadProgrammer Jul 1 '14 at 8:54
3  
At least the error is appropriate for this site. But recursion is your enemy here. –  Davio Jul 1 '14 at 8:55
    
Why downvote can I know the reason? –  harinewton Jul 1 '14 at 10:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Exampel1 creates new instances recursively in the constructor.

The static field will only be created once. That's why example 1 created the overflow and the second does not.

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So whether a constructor call is just a method call with special syntax? –  harinewton Jul 1 '14 at 9:02
    
@harinewton what are you actually trying to achieve? You have unbound recursion, it will crash no matter if you wrap it into method, constructor or anything else. –  Andrey Jul 1 '14 at 9:06
    
I actually don't understand the question. A constructor will create an instance of a class. Therefore, anything which is needed to create the instance, will be executed. There is no differences to methods at that point. So anything you'll do in a constructor can be done in a method, except for returning values/references. When you make a recursive call, it will be recursive and if there is no condition to stop it, the overflow will occur. –  Florian Salihovic Jul 1 '14 at 9:09
    
A method recursive call will be just build up the stack with local state, but since it is in constructor, so I am getting Example1.<init>(Example1.java:14) in stack trace. I want to understand what how that happens during constructor call. –  harinewton Jul 1 '14 at 9:15
1  
A constructor call is not just another method call. It is however a special case of method call. During object construction the JVM will invoke a method that it has synthersized during compilation called <init>. In that method will be the code that you have added to the constructor. The life cycle around this code is special to the JVM, hence it is not just another method call. But for the purposes of the StackOverFlow that you saw, then yes that is the cause. –  Chris K Jul 1 '14 at 9:19

Static modifier implies that whatever you made static is shared among all the objects of that class. Since I believe you want to make something like a "default object" inside each Example1 object, the best way to do it is to make it static. This way, you can create as many Example1 objects as you want (or your memory allows) but every one of them will share the static Example1 zero object.

Non static object here is impossible, because it will otherwise try to create another Example1 object inside the Example1 object you just created, which will of course have another Example1 object in an infinite loop, as other people has already stated.

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