Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Possible Duplicates:
Painless way to trim leading/trailing whitespace in C?
Trim a string in C

Hi guys, I was writing the String trim method in c and this is the code I came up with. I think it does the job of eliminating leading and trailing whitespaces however, I wish the code could be cleaner. Can you suggest improvements.

void trim(char *String)
{
int i=0;j=0;
char c,lastc;
while(String[i])
{
   c=String[i];
   if(c!=' ')
   {
     String[j]=c;
     j++;
   }
   else if(lastc!= ' ')
   {
     String[j]=c;
     j++;

   }
   lastc = c;
   i++;
}

Does this code look clean ??

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Joel, Mark Elliot, JRL, Tim Post, SilentGhost Mar 16 '10 at 11:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
well it only checks for the SPACE character. White space usually consists of checking for TAB, Carriage Return and Line Feed – Jarrod Roberson Mar 15 '10 at 21:47
8  
    
adding comments would help – Drakosha Mar 15 '10 at 21:48
    
Posted an answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/656542/trim-a-string-in-c/… – JRL Mar 15 '10 at 22:44

It doesn't look clean. Assuming the first character is a space, you're using lastc with an undefined value. You're leaving one space at the end (if there's a space at the end, when it's hit c will be a space and lastc won't).

You're also not terminating the string. Assuming you fix the uninitialized lastc problem, you'll transform " abc" to "abcbc", since it's not being shortened at any point.

The code also collapses multiple spaces inside the string. This isn't what you described; is it desired behavior?

share|improve this answer

There's several problems with that code. It only checks for space. Not tabs or newlines. You are copying the entire non-whitespace part of the string. And you are using lastc before setting it.

Here's an alternate version (compiled but not tested):

char *trim(char *string)
{
    char *start;
    int len = strlen(string);
    int i;

    /* Find the first non whitespace char */
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (! isspace(string[i])) {
            break;
        }
    }

    if (i == len) {
        /* string is all whitespace */
        return NULL;
    }

    start = &string[i];

    /* Remove trailing white space */
    for (i = len; i > 0; i--) {
        if (isspace(string[i])) {
            string[i] = '\0';
        } else {
            break;
        }
    }

    return start;
}
share|improve this answer

There are some problems: lastc could be used uninitialized. And you could make use of a for loop instead of a while loop, for example. Furthermore, trim/strip functions usually replace spaces, tabs and newlines.

Here's a solution using pointers that I wrote quite a while ago:

void trim(char *str)
{
    char *ptr = str;
    while(*ptr == ' ' || *ptr == '\t' || *ptr == '\r' || *ptr == '\n') ++ptr;

    char *end = ptr;
    while(*end) ++end;

    if(end > ptr)
    {
        for(--end; end >= ptr && (*end == ' ' || *end == '\t' || *end == '\r' || *end == '\n'); --end);
    }

    memmove(str, ptr, end-ptr);
    str[end-ptr] = 0;
} 
share|improve this answer

It often makes your code more readable if you make judicious use of the standard library functions - for example, isspace() and memmove() are particularly useful here:

#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

void trim(char *str)
{
    char *start, *end;

    /* Find first non-whitespace */
    for (start = str; *start; start++)
    {
        if (!isspace((unsigned char)start[0]))
            break;
    }

    /* Find start of last all-whitespace */
    for (end = start + strlen(start); end > start + 1; end--)
    {
        if (!isspace((unsigned char)end[-1]))
            break;
    }

    *end = 0; /* Truncate last whitespace */

    /* Shift from "start" to the beginning of the string */
    if (start > str)
        memmove(str, start, (end - start) + 1);
}
share|improve this answer

Here is my solution.

Short, simple, clean, commented, and lightly tested.

It uses the "isspace" classification function, so you can easily change your definition of "white space" to be trimmed.

void trim(char* String)
{
    int dest;
    int src=0;
    int len = strlen(String);

    // Advance src to the first non-whitespace character.
    while(isspace(String[src])) src++;

    // Copy the string to the "front" of the buffer
    for(dest=0; src<len; dest++, src++) 
    {
        String[dest] = String[src];
    }

    // Working backwards, set all trailing spaces to NULL.
    for(dest=len-1; isspace(String[dest]); --dest)
    {
        String[dest] = '\0';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This could be dangerous when strlen(String) is 0. – user85509 Mar 16 '10 at 6:25

Instead of comparing a character with the space character ' ', I'd use the "isspace" function, which I believe is defined in ctype.h.

share|improve this answer

I don't know about clean, but I find it hard to follow. If I needed to do this I'd initially think of it in two phases:

  1. Figure out how many characters to drop from the beginning, then memmove the rest of the string (including the null terminator) to the start address. (You might not need the memmove if you are allowed to return a different start pointer, but if so you need to be very careful with memory hygiene.)
  2. Figure out how many characters to drop from the (new) end and set a new null terminator there.

I might then look more closely at a one-pass solution like you seem to be trying to implement, but only if there was a speed problem.

By the way, you probably want to use isspace() rather than checking only for space.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.