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I have a http handler which should write to output some text. Text content is retrieved asynchronously, so I want to write to response stream in the ProcessRequest method like this:

GetContent().ContinueWith(task => 
{
    using (var stream = task.Result)
    {
        stream.WriteTo(context.Response.OutputStream);
    }
});

However, I get a NullReferenceException with the stack trace

in System.Web.HttpWriter.BufferData(Byte[] data, Int32 offset, Int32 size, Boolean needToCopyData)
   in System.Web.HttpWriter.WriteFromStream(Byte[] data, Int32 offset, Int32 size)
   in System.Web.HttpResponseStream.Write(Byte[] buffer, Int32 offset, Int32 count)
   in System.IO.MemoryStream.WriteTo(Stream stream)
   in SomeHandler.<>c__DisplayClass1.<ProcessRequest>b__0(Task`1 task) in SomeHandler.cs:line 33
   in System.Threading.Tasks.ContinuationTaskFromResultTask`1.InnerInvoke()
   in System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()

If I do not use ContinueWith and write response after task.Wait() - there are no errors, but, obviously it is not a solution.

var task = GetContent();
task.Wait();
using (var stream = task.Result)
{
    stream.WriteTo(context.Response.OutputStream);
}

How can I eliminate this error? (.net 4.0 is used)

share|improve this question
    
are you able to use a modern flavor of c#? can you do it in the async/await pattern? –  Daniel A. White Jul 1 '14 at 12:36
    
the response is likely already sent by the time ContinueWith is invoked. –  Daniel A. White Jul 1 '14 at 12:36
    
O, forgot to mention - I use .net 4.0 –  eternity Jul 1 '14 at 12:36
    
then that answers my question as "no". i've tagged your question to denote that. –  Daniel A. White Jul 1 '14 at 12:37
1  
@Noseratio, I am using VS 2013 –  eternity Jul 1 '14 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to implement IHttpAsyncHandler. Check "Walkthrough: Creating an Asynchronous HTTP Handler".

On top of that, you can use async/await to copy the stream (note CopyAsync below). To be able to use async/await and target .NET 4.0 with VS2012+, add Microsoft.Bcl.Async package to your project.

This way, no threads are unnecessary blocked. A complete example (untested):

public partial class AsyncHandler : IHttpAsyncHandler
{
    async Task CopyAsync(HttpContext context)
    {
        using (var stream = await GetContentAsync(context))
        {
            await stream.CopyToAsync(context.Response.OutputStream);
        }
    }

    #region IHttpAsyncHandler
    public IAsyncResult BeginProcessRequest(HttpContext context, AsyncCallback cb, object extraData)
    {
        return new AsyncResult(cb, extraData, CopyAsync(context));
    }

    public void EndProcessRequest(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        // at this point, the task has compeleted
        // we use Wait() only to re-throw any errors
        ((AsyncResult)result).Task.Wait();
    }

    public bool IsReusable
    {
        get { return true; }
    }

    public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
    #endregion

    #region AsyncResult
    class AsyncResult : IAsyncResult
    {
        object _state;
        Task _task;
        bool _completedSynchronously;

        public AsyncResult(AsyncCallback callback, object state, Task task)
        {
            _state = state;
            _task = task;
            _completedSynchronously = _task.IsCompleted;
            _task.ContinueWith(t => callback(this), TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously);
        }

        public Task Task
        {
            get { return _task; }
        }

        #region IAsyncResult
        public object AsyncState
        {
            get { return _state; }
        }

        public System.Threading.WaitHandle AsyncWaitHandle
        {
            get { return ((IAsyncResult)_task).AsyncWaitHandle; }
        }

        public bool CompletedSynchronously
        {
            get { return _completedSynchronously; }
        }

        public bool IsCompleted
        {
            get { return _task.IsCompleted; }
        }
        #endregion
    }
    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. This is exactly what I need. Could you describe a little lot - why we need wait task at EndProcessRequest? –  eternity Jul 1 '14 at 16:16
1  
@eternity, the Wait() is there to observe any exceptions, possibly thrown by the Task logic. If the task has completed successfully, the Wait does nothing, and the response is successfully sent to the client. Otherwise, the exception is re-thrown and propagated to ASP.NET. Note that EndProcessRequest is called from inside the cb callback, which is provided by ASP.NET and which we call from ContinueWith. –  Noseratio Jul 1 '14 at 20:56
1  
Thanks a lot, @Noseratio, that's clear now. –  eternity Jul 2 '14 at 6:28

This problem could be based on the "context-switch" which happens when the task is executed in its own thread.

The current HttpContext is only available in the requests thread. You could however make a "local reference" to be able to access it (but that would not completely solve your problem - see below):

var outputStream = context.Response.OutputStream;
GetContent().ContinueWith(task => 
{
    using (var stream = task.Result)
    {
        stream.WriteTo(outputStream);
    }
});

The problem now is, that your request is very likely already done when the ContinueWith is executed so your stream to the client is already closed.
You need to write your content to the stream before this happens.

I need to strike the follwoing part of my answer. Http handlers are not async-capable in 4.0 as this neets the HttpTaskAsyncHandler base-class which is not available before 4.5 => I don't know a way around the Wait in the ProcessRequest method in 4.0 when using a http handler:

I recommend using something like the following:

using(var result = await GetContent())
{
    stream.WriteTo(context.Response.OutputStream);
}

and the appropriate NuGet-Package for await.

share|improve this answer
    
No, the error occurs while already in MemoryStream.WriteTo. This means that the context was not null. –  usr Jul 1 '14 at 13:01
    
@usr: True, then maybe it is because of my second point: The stream is already closed when it gets to the BufferData... –  ChrFin Jul 1 '14 at 13:14
    
That would not result in a crash inside the BCL. It would result in some proper exception. –  usr Jul 1 '14 at 13:17
    
...and why would a NullReferenceException not be a "proper exception"? –  ChrFin Jul 1 '14 at 13:30
    
Because it indicates that a bug has happened and doesn't help the caller resolve the problem. All classes in the BCL are designed not to crash with things like nullref, index out of bounds, ... They crash with descriptive messages. –  usr Jul 1 '14 at 13:32

Quite recently, I had come across the similar task to write an ashx handler to put response asynchronously. The purpose was to generate some big string, perform I/O and return it back on the response stream, and thus benchmark ASP.NET with other languages like node.js for a heavily I/O bound app I'm going to develop. This is what I ended up doing (it works):

    private StringBuilder payload = null;

    private async void processAsync()
    {
        var r = new Random (DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());

        //generate a random string of 108kb
        payload=new StringBuilder();
        for (var i = 0; i < 54000; i++)
            payload.Append( (char)(r.Next(65,90)));

        //create a unique file
        var fname = "";
        do
        {
            //fname = @"c:\source\csharp\asyncdemo\" + r.Next (1, 99999999).ToString () + ".txt";
            fname =  r.Next (1, 99999999).ToString () + ".txt";
        } while(File.Exists(fname));            

        //write the string to disk in async manner
        using(FileStream fs = new FileStream(fname,FileMode.CreateNew,FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None,
            bufferSize: 4096, useAsync: true))
        {
            var bytes=(new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding ()).GetBytes (payload.ToString());
            await fs.WriteAsync (bytes,0,bytes.Length);
            fs.Close ();
        }

        //read the string back from disk in async manner
        payload = new StringBuilder ();
        //FileStream ;
        //payload.Append(await fs.ReadToEndAsync ());
        using (var fs = new FileStream (fname, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read,
                   FileShare.Read, bufferSize: 4096, useAsync: true)) {
            int numRead;
            byte[] buffer = new byte[0x1000];
            while ((numRead = await fs.ReadAsync (buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) != 0) {
                payload.Append (Encoding.Unicode.GetString (buffer, 0, numRead));
            }
        }


        //fs.Close ();
        //File.Delete (fname); //remove the file
    }

    public void ProcessRequest (HttpContext context)
    {
        Task task = new Task(processAsync);
        task.Start ();
        task.Wait ();

        //write the string back on the response stream
        context.Response.ContentType = "text/plain";
        context.Response.Write (payload.ToString());
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
This is NOT really async, as the request thread is blocked at the task.Wait() - to be "really async" this thread should be released during that wait (which can be achived by using await). –  ChrFin Jul 1 '14 at 13:12
    
Besides @chrfin's point, passing async void method to new Task(processAsync) doesn't work the way you might think it would. This task is completed as soon as the first await has been reached inside processAsync. –  Noseratio Jul 1 '14 at 13:14
    
@chrfin - The original question also contains the same logic that uses the Wait() method. And Wait() doesn't actually block requests on a lower level. Read this MSDN article: blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2009/10/15/9907713.aspx –  Prahlad Yeri Jul 1 '14 at 13:18
3  
And Wait() doesn't actually block requests on a lower level - yes it does. Read your linked article again! It may not use one additional thread-pool-thread, but it definitely blocks the request thread so IIS can not execute another request with it - and that is the point of the "async" in such cases, as these request threads are limited. @down-votes: you got two down-votes and two explanations, so what else do you want? –  ChrFin Jul 1 '14 at 13:35
1  
Again: IIS can't use the thread while Wait is running and thats what you should avoid. You should use await task; as this does release the thread back to IIS until the IO is done and returns afterwards. –  ChrFin Jul 1 '14 at 13:46

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