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Consider the following code:

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var square = new Square(4);
            Console.WriteLine(square.Calculate());
        }
    }

    class MathOp
    {        
        protected MathOp(Func<int> calc) { _calc = calc; }
        public int Calculate() { return _calc(); }
        private Func<int> _calc;
    }

    class Square : MathOp
    {
        public Square(int operand)
            : base(() => _operand * _operand)  // runtime exception
        {
            _operand = operand;
        }

        private int _operand;
    }
}

(ignore the class design; I'm not actually writing a calculator! this code merely represents a minimal repro for a much bigger problem that took awhile to narrow down)

I would expect it to either:

  • print "16", OR
  • throw a compile time error if closing over a member field is not allowed in this scenario

Instead I get a nonsensical exception thrown at the indicated line. On the 3.0 CLR it's a NullReferenceException; on the Silverlight CLR it's the infamous Operation could destabilize the runtime.

share|improve this question
    
It doesn't compile for me.... "An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property 'ConsoleApplication2 .Square._operand'". Is this your exact code ? –  Thomas Levesque Mar 16 '10 at 0:06
    
Yes, it's a copy/paste, and it compiles for me. –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 0:11
    
Note that I'm on VS2008 -- as Aaron noted, the 2010 compiler team may have classified this as a bug (i.e. agreed with me :)) –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 0:20
4  
It is a bug in the compiler, it should have generated a compile time error. Eric Lippert is already aware of it from another thread. –  Hans Passant Mar 16 '10 at 0:22
    
@nobugz interesting, thanks. –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 0:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's not going to result in a compile-time error because it is a valid closure.

The problem is that this is not initialized yet at the time the closure is created. Your constructor hasn't actually run yet when that argument is supplied. So the resulting NullReferenceException is actually quite logical. It's this that's null!

I'll prove it to you. Let's rewrite the code this way:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var test = new DerivedTest();
        object o = test.Func();
        Console.WriteLine(o == null);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

class BaseTest
{
    public BaseTest(Func<object> func)
    {
        this.Func = func;
    }

    public Func<object> Func { get; private set; }
}

class DerivedTest : BaseTest
{
    public DerivedTest() : base(() => this)
    {
    }
}

Guess what this prints? Yep, it's true, the closure returns null because this is not initialized when it executes.

Edit

I was curious about Thomas's statement, thinking that maybe they'd changed the behaviour in a subsequent VS release. I actually found a Microsoft Connect issue about this very thing. It was closed as "won't fix." Odd.

As Microsoft says in their response, it is normally invalid to use the this reference from within the argument list of a base constructor call; the reference simply does not exist at that point in time and you will actually get a compile-time error if you try to use it "naked." So, arguably it should produce a compile error for the closure case, but the this reference is hidden from the compiler, which (at least in VS 2008) would have to know to look for it inside the closure in order to prevent people from doing this. It doesn't, which is why you end up with this behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you try it ? I get a compilation error... –  Thomas Levesque Mar 16 '10 at 0:09
    
@Thomas Levesque: Yes I did, and it compiled, and I got the same runtime error. Curious that you got a compile error; I'm on VS 2008, are you on VS 2010? Maybe they classified this as a bug and updated the compiler to detect this? –  Aaronaught Mar 16 '10 at 0:11
    
+1 Good explanation. I suspected it, but couldn't be certain the lack of /this/ pointer in my Watch Window wasn't just a VS quirk (I find it gets confused far too easily). –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 0:23
    
Indeed, it compiles with VS2008, not with VS2010... –  Thomas Levesque Mar 16 '10 at 0:24
2  
@Thomas Levesque: That raises further questions, since, as I now note in my edit, this was reported to Microsoft and they closed the issue as "Won't Fix" - and then they fixed it! Sigh –  Aaronaught Mar 16 '10 at 0:29

It was a compiler bug that has been fixed. The code should never have been legal in the first place, and if we were going to allow it, we should have at least generated valid code. My bad. Sorry about the inconvenience.

share|improve this answer

How about this:

using System;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var square = new Square(4);
            Console.WriteLine(square.Calculate());
        }
    }

    class MathOp
    {
        protected MathOp(Expression<Func<int>> calc) { _calc = calc.Compile(); }
        public int Calculate() { return _calc(); }
        private Func<int> _calc;
    }

    class Square : MathOp
    {
        public Square(int operand)
            : base(() => _operand * _operand)
        {
            _operand = operand;
        }

        private int _operand;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
interesting way to defer resolution. Still doesn't work in 2010 though. –  Jimmy Mar 16 '10 at 1:46
    
Clever. +1 for the quickest fix (no refactoring needed). –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 2:44

Have you tried using () => operand * operand instead? The issue is that there's no certainty that _operand will be set by the time you call the base. Yes, it's trying to create a closure on your method, and there's no guarantee of the order of things here.

Since you're not setting _operand at all, I'd recommend just using () => operand * operand instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
It will work, but it has a very different meaning... –  Thomas Levesque Mar 16 '10 at 0:07
    
Suffice to say this defeats the purpose. In my "real" code I have several very complex MathOps. Some of the steps are common to all MathOps, so I place them in the base class. In one particular Op, the first part of the calculation is invariant -- I wanted to optimize it by caching the intermediate result in a member field, then letting the rest of the calculation (which varies based on the parameters to Calculate) proceed as usual. –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 0:18
1  
@Richard Berg: Perhaps you could work around the issue by using a protected initializer method instead? I'm sure you've already thought of that, but it can't hurt to mention... –  Aaronaught Mar 16 '10 at 0:30
    
That might work. /// FWIW, the actual scenario is a large inheritance tree rooted on IComparable<T>. Lots of abstract classes building on each other in such a way I feel is highly optimized [assuming proper JIT inlining] yet obeys DRY strictly. By the time I hit today's issue I was out of this framework code, implementing a custom comparer for some complex types in a specific application, head stuck deeply in Expression<> mojo. Guess it took me by surprise that the root cause was so fundamental to a design which by then was working perfectly in many other places. –  Richard Berg Mar 16 '10 at 2:59
    
I think what you want to do is call a private static function within your derived class to compute the optimization result and return that; like this: public Square(int operand) : base(ComputeSquare(operand)) {} along with private static int ComputeSquare(int operand) { return operand * operand; } –  Gabe Mar 16 '10 at 6:08

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