Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a program that waits for commands on STDIN. It takes about ~2 seconds to be ready to accept those commands and after every command there needs to be at least a 1 second delay.

So far I have tried inside my script.

./myprogram << EOF
command1
command2
command3
EOF

The above works sometimes depending on how long it takes the program to start and how long it takes the commands to execute.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Are you sure the pauses are really needed? Most programs will buffer input and seamlessly run the next command when they're ready with the previous one.

If the pauses are needed, this is a job for expect. It's been a while since I've used expect, but you want a script that looks pretty much like this:

spawn myprogram                # start your program
sleep 2                        # wait 2 seconds
send "command1\r"              # send a command
sleep 1
send "command2\r"
sleep 1
send "exit\r"
wait                           # wait until the program exits

(A big "gotcha" is that each line of input must be terminated with \r (and NOT \n). That's easy to miss.)

This can be improved however: you waste time if a command takes less than a second to run. Or maybe sometimes a command will take longer than expected. Since most interactive programs display some sort of prompt, it's better to use that as a cue. Expect makes this very easy. For this example I'm assuming your program prints "Ready>" when it's ready to accept a new command.

spawn myprogram
expect "Ready>"
send "command1\r"
expect "Ready>"
send "command2\r"
expect "Ready>"
send "exit\r"
wait

You'll have to consult the expect documentation for more advance features, e.g. to add error handling (what to do if some command fails?).

share|improve this answer
    
Expect works very well! Thanks this was ultimately the best solution because at the end of the script I can simply add "interact" to give the user back control. Thanks –  user3794421 Jul 2 at 13:42

You could try this:

 ( sleep 2
   echo command1
   sleep 1
   echo command2
   sleep 1
   echo command3
   sleep 1 ) | ./myprogram

or look into the expect command.

share|improve this answer

Use sleep 1 between your commands

share|improve this answer

You may try the following:

./myprogram << EOF
command1
$(sleep 2)
command2
$(sleep 2)
command3
EOF

But I would strongly suggest you to take a look at expect:

http://linuxaria.com/howto/2-practical-examples-of-expect-on-the-linux-cli

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.