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I have a database that stores Feeds and their articles. Users can have subscriptions to them and I allow them to categorize them by Folders, which I solved by using Tags i store in a relation to the Users and Feeds table.

The tables look like this:

Feeds:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Feed](
[Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[Url] [nvarchar](250) NOT NULL,
...

FeedItems:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FeedItem](
[Id] [bigint] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[FeedId] [int] NOT NULL, -- FK to Feed
..

FeedTags:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FeedTag](
[Id] [bigint] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[UserId] [int] NOT NULL, -- FK to Users
[FeedId] [int] NOT NULL, -- FK to Feed
...

I spare User and UserSubscriptions tables as they're pretty obvious and not really part of the Problem (IMHO).

On FeedItem, I have a clustered index with [FeedId] ASC, [Id] DESC

I choose DESC on Id as I sort feeditems always descending by their Id and I'm most of the time intrested in the most recent items. I also choose this index because normally, I'd like to know the FeedItems of a specific Feed.

But when I need to query for a range of Feeds, for example when I want the top 50 articles for all subscriptions of the user, or the top 50 articles of a specific Folder (= Feeds with a specific FeedTag), things get complicated. Mainly if there are many Feeds and/or the Feeds have a lot of articles.

In most cases, SQL Server chooses to do a Clustered Index Seek on FeedItems and, as far as I can tell from the row Counts, it retrieves all articles from the affected Feeds from the disk. This can cause a lot of physical reads.

Here is an example query:

select f.Id, f.Name, fi.Id, fi.Title, fi.Inserted
from Feed f
inner join FeedItem fi on f.id = fi.feedid
where (exists (select 1 from UserSubscription us where us.UserId = @userId and us.FeedId = f.Id))
and (exists(select 1 from FeedTag ft where ft.FeedId = f.id and ft.UserId = @userId and ft.TagId = @tagid))
order by fi.id desc

The resulting execution plan Looks like this:

Execution plan

Obviously, SQL Server needs all rows for sorting to apply the top 50 on these sorted results as the clustered index not really has the items in the perfect sort order when I'm limiting the results by FeedId.

Is there a way to help SQL Server not needing to get each and every FeedItem of each feed? I thought a lot about it but I can't come up with an additional index that would help here.

Is there a better data model that could help in such a scenario? Or could the query be improved?

Any ideas & help would be greatly appreciated :)

share|improve this question
    
As a general remark: Ordering will always be an expensive operation. If you want the TOP x articles Ordered by some parameter you have to retrieve all articles anyway. – Martin K. Jul 1 '14 at 17:58
    
@MartinK.: unless you have an index on that parameter, of course. – Quassnoi Jul 1 '14 at 18:01
    
That's why I have the clustered index on FeedItemId being desc ... to match exactly the ordered by clause. But of course, when limiting the result set, this doesn't work anymore, while it works just fine when I query only for 1 feed. I thought it should be possible that SQL Server could use this approach for 1 feed and use the clustered index on FeedId/Id on FeedItem to retrieve a max of 50 rows per feed for ordering later. Of course it does not do that and instead gets every row of every queried feed, I'm sure for good reason, so I need another approach :) – Bernhard König Jul 1 '14 at 19:21
1  
@BernhardKönig: to retrieve a max of 50 rows per feed for ordering later: this is not as efficient as having the indexed view, but definitely possible. – Quassnoi Jul 2 '14 at 17:04
    
@BernhardKönig: see the update in my answer – Quassnoi Jul 2 '14 at 17:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create indexed views.

This one for top items per user:

CREATE VIEW
        UserFeedItem
WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
SELECT  us.userId, fi.feedId, fi.id AS feedItemId
FROM    dbo.UserSubscription us
JOIN    dbo.FeedItem fi
ON      fi.userId = us.userId
        AND fi.feedId = us.feedId
GO

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX
        UX_UserFeedItem_User_FeedItem
ON      UserFeedItem (userId, feedItemId)
GO

, and this one for top items per user with given tag:

CREATE VIEW
        UserTagFeedItem
WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
SELECT  us.userId, ft.tagId, fi.feedId, fi.id AS feedItemId
FROM    dbo.FeedItem fi
JOIN    dbo.UserSubscription us
ON      us.feedId = fi.feedId
JOIN    dbo.FeedTag ft
ON      ft.feedId = fi.feedId
        AND ft.userId = us.userId
GO

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX
        UX_UserTagFeedItem_User_Tag_FeedItem
ON      UserFeedItem (userId, tagId, feedItemId)
GO

Top 50 user's items:

SELECT  TOP 50
        f.*, fi.*
FROM    UserFeedItem fi WITH (NOEXPAND)
JOIN    FeedItem fi
ON      fi.feedId = ufi.feedId
        AND fi.id = ufi.feedItemId
JOIN    Feed f
ON      f.id = fi.feedId
WHERE   ufi.userId = @userId
ORDER BY
        ufi.feedItemId DESC

Top 50 user's items in a tag:

SELECT  TOP 50
        f.*, fi.*
FROM    UserTagFeedItem fi WITH (NOEXPAND)
JOIN    FeedItem fi
ON      fi.feedId = ufi.feedId
        AND fi.id = ufi.feedItemId
JOIN    Feed f
ON      f.id = fi.feedId
WHERE   ufi.userId = @userId
        AND tagId = @tagId
ORDER BY
        ufi.feedItemId DESC

Update:

If you are reluctant to create the indexed views for any reason, you can use this query:

SELECT  TOP 50
        f.*, fi.*
FROM    UserSubscription us
JOIN    Feed f
ON      f.id = us.feedId
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 50
                *
        FROM    FeedItem fi
        WHERE   fi.feedId = f.id
        ORDER BY
                fi.id DESC
        ) fi
WHERE   us.userId = @userId
ORDER BY
        fi.id DESC

or this (for tags):

SELECT  TOP 50
        f.*, fi.*
FROM    UserSubscription us
JOIN    FeedTag ft
ON      ft.userId = us.userId
JOIN    Feed f
ON      f.id = us.feedId
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 50
                *
        FROM    FeedItem fi
        WHERE   fi.feedId = f.id
        ORDER BY
                fi.id DESC
        ) fi
WHERE   us.userId = @userId
        AND ft.tagId = @tagId
ORDER BY
        fi.id DESC

You need to create the following indexes:

UserSubscription (userId, feedId) -- unique
FeedTag (userId, tagId, feedId) -- unique

Those queries are not as efficient as those over indexed views, but they will fetch at most N * 50 records from FeedItem, where N is the number of subscribed (or subscribed and tagged) feeds for the given user.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I haven't worked with indexed views yet, I'll give it a try. One Problem is that TOP 50 is just an example of how many records I want, this is dynamic between 1 and 1000. But I think if I would built the views with TOP 1000, it would perfectly Support TOP 50 to, right? I'll just have to test how those view works and what their Performance, storage and Memory Impact is. – Bernhard König Jul 1 '14 at 17:30
1  
@BernhardKönig: sure, you can pass it as a parameter: SELECT TOP (@records) * FROM .... The indexed views basically materialize the results of the underlying queries in a table, so they work with any number of records. – Quassnoi Jul 1 '14 at 17:50
    
TOP (@variable) won't work with SQL Server 2000 or below, just for the records. – Martin K. Jul 1 '14 at 17:55
    
That's interesting ... I'm testing with your 2nd cross apply query and it returns the same row 50 times ... I currently don't exactly understand why ... – Bernhard König Jul 3 '14 at 11:40
    
@BernhardKönig: are you sure that UserSubscription (userId, feedId) and FeedTag (userId, tagId, feedId) are unique? – Quassnoi Jul 3 '14 at 12:45

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