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I'm trying to write a drop-in replacement for System.Media.SoundPlayer using the waveOut... API. This API makes a callback to a method in my version of SoundPlayer when the file/stream passed it has completed playback.

If I create a form-scoped instance of my SoundPlayer and play something, everything works fine because the form keeps the object alive, so the delegate is alive to receive the callback.

If I use it like this in, say, a button click event:

SoundPlayer player = new SoundPlayer(@"C:\whatever.wav");
player.Play();

... it works fine 99% of the time, but occasionally (and frequently if the file is long) the SoundPlayer object is garbage-collected before the file completes, so the delegate is no longer there to receive the callback, and I get an ugly error.

I know how to "pin" objects using GCHandle.Alloc, but only when something else can hang onto the handle. Is there any way for an object to pin itself internally, and then un-pin itself after a period of time (or completion of playback)? If I try GCHandle.Alloc (this, GCHandleType.Pinned);, I get a run-time exception "Object contains non-primitive or non-blittable data."

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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could just have a static collection of all the "currently playing" sounds, and simply remove the SoundPlayer instance when it gets the "finished playing" notification. Like this:

class SoundPlayer
{
    private static List<SoundPlayer> playing = new List<SoundPlayer>();

    public void Play(...)
    {
        ...
        playing.Add(this);
    }

    // assuming this is your callback when playing has finished
    public void OnPlayingFinished(...)
    {
        ...
        playing.Remove(this);
    }
}

(Obviously locking/multithreading, error checking and so on required)

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I'm actually in the middle of trying this out. You'll get the check if it works! –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 2:48
    
This is not thread safe. –  SLaks Mar 16 '10 at 2:51
    
@SLaks: As I said, I left that as an exercise for the reader... Also, in your solution, if the 'OnSoundFinished' callback is called from a different thread, then it won't work. It'd be simpler to just have one list and add locks around it. –  Dean Harding Mar 16 '10 at 2:57
    
@codeka: it is called from a separate thread, so you're right, it doesn't work. –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 3:17
1  
HashSet is a better choice than List. –  Matthew Flaschen Mar 16 '10 at 3:21
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Your SoundPlayer object should just be stored in a private field of your form class so that it stays referenced long enough. You probably need to dispose it when your form closes.

Fwiw, pinning doesn't work because your class is missing a [StructLayout] attribute. Not that it will work effectively with one, you would have to store the returned GCHandle somewhere so that you can unpin it later. Your form class is the only logical place to store it. Make it simple.

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+1 although I disagree. I'm trying to make it simpler and less of a pain to use SoundPlayer in my code, and also make it able to play more than one sound at a time. –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 2:56
    
You need to keep the internal plumbing that keep the file playing alive. That doesn't have to be part of the SoundPlayer instance. A thread or a "completed" event could be enough, it depends. –  Hans Passant Mar 16 '10 at 3:19
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The best way to do this is to keep a [ThreadStatic] list of active SoundPlayers in a private static field, and remove each instance from the list when the sound finishes.

For example:

[ThreadStatic]
static List<SoundPlayer> activePlayers;

public void Play() {
    if(activePlayers == null) activePlayers = new List<SoundPlayer>();
    activePlayers.Add(this);
    //Start playing the sound
}
void OnSoundFinished() {
    activePlayers.Remove(this);
}
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That has a weird effect. I'm using the wave callback (the "done" message) to remove the player from the static list, with code almost identical to yours. Without the [ThreadStatic] tag, it works; with the tag as above, the activePlayers.Remove(this); line fails the first time it's hit, with a NullReferenceException that claims activePlayers is null. This is definitely after the initial call to Play which instantiates activePlayers. –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 3:06
1  
This is probably because the callback is being called on a different thread to one that started playing the sound. Just use a non-ThreadStatic instance and put locks around it to make it thread-safe. –  Dean Harding Mar 16 '10 at 3:16
    
Is there a different way to make this thread-safe? OnSoundFinished(...) is called from a different thread, which explains the null reference exception. –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 3:19
    
@MusiGenesis: You could use one of the thread safe collections from .Net 4. –  SLaks Mar 16 '10 at 13:12
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GCHandle is the way to go; just don't specify the Pinned enum value.

The problem with a class static member (such as shown here) is that the objects may be collected too early if the managed portion of the program no longer references them. The referenced example shows using a callback "OnPlayingFinished", but now you have to worry about keeping the delegate (the one that references OnPlayingFinished) from itself being garbage collected.

You will still need to register for OnPlayingFinished, and keep the delegate alive. However, the GCHandle is keeping your object alive, so you can keep the delegate around with:

class SoundPlayer
{

    public void Play(...)
    {
        var h = GCHandle.Alloc(this);
        SomeNativeAPI.Play(this, h.ToIntPtr());
    }

    // assuming this is your callback when playing has finished
    delegate void FinishedCallback(IntPtr userData);
    static FinishedCallback finishedCallback = OnPlayingFinished;
    public static void OnPlayingFinished(IntPtr userData)
    {
        var h = GCHandle.FromIntPtr(userData);
        SoundPlayer This = (SoundPlayer)h.Target;
        h.Free();

        ... // use 'This' as your object
    }
}

We've ensured our SoundPlayer remains reachable via the GCHandle. And as an instance of SoundPlayer remains reachable, its static members must also remain reachable.

At least, that's my best educated guess as to how you might go about it.

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Human memory (mine, anyway) is very strange: I have no memory of asking this question, and I don't really know what I was trying to achieve. It's especially weird because my hobby is writing software synthesizers using low-level audio APIs (like waveOut... for Windows), so I'm not sure why I would have wanted anything like SoundPlayer. –  MusiGenesis Oct 27 '11 at 23:50
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This might sound too simple, but just make a strong reference to the SoundPlayer object in your own class. That ought to keep GC away as long as the object is alive.

I.e. instead of:

public class YourProgram
{
    void Play()
    {
       SoundPlayer player = new SoundPlayer(@"c:\whatever.wac");
       player.Play();
    }
}

This:

public class YourProgram
{
    private SoundPlayer player;
    void Play()
    {
       player = new SoundPlayer(@"c:\whatever.wac");
       player.Play();
    }
}
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Are you simply trying to prevent your object from being garbage collected? Couldn't you call GC.KeepAlive( this ) to protect it from the GC?

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Where inside of the SoundPlayer class would you put this call? If you put in at the end of the constructor, it will keep this alive until the end of the constructor, at which point most objects are still alive, anyway. :) GC.KeepAlive (this) isn't really functionally different than something like this.Happiness += 1; - by referencing this, it's just making sure that the object stays alive until that point in the code. –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 3:15
    
You would call it at the end of your Play method. The compiler will see the call and ensure your object is protected from GC until the Play method is completed. –  Thomas Mar 16 '10 at 5:38
    
I'm assuming that at some point your Play method gets some handle to unmanaged code and that gets GC'd before Play finishes? It would be at the end of your Play method on the unmanaged handle that you would want to call KeepAlive. –  Thomas Mar 16 '10 at 5:50
    
The Play method (which wraps waveOutWrite) just begins the audio playback and then returns immediately, so it's asynchronous. I need to make sure the object stays alive until the playback completes and the WaveCallback is called. There's no way to do that unless something somewhere keeps a reference to it. In this case, the only thing I can think of is a static internal collection, as in codeka's answer. –  MusiGenesis Mar 16 '10 at 6:02
    
Given that, I'd agree that Codeka's solution will work better. –  Thomas Mar 16 '10 at 6:03
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