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This seems to be weird:

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {  

    cout << "function main() .." << '\n';  

    char ch = 0;  
    double number_value=1.1;  

    cin >> ch;  
    cin.putback(ch);  

    cin >> number_value;  
    cout << "1 .. " << " " << cin.good() << " " << number_value << '\n';  
    cin >> number_value;  
    cout << "2 .. " << " " << cin.good() << " " << number_value << '\n';  

    return 0;  

}  

If I input the following:

7a 1  

I get the following:

function main() ..

7a 1  
1 ..  1 7  
2 ..  0 0  

I understand the:

1 ..  1 7 

but why the variable number_value is 0. cin.good() shows failure so nothing would have read and the value in number_value from the previous assignment would remain. I expect the value of 7.

share|improve this question
    
You can use std::boolalpha to turn those 1s and 0s into true and false. –  Roger Pate Mar 16 '10 at 5:17
1  
Note that cin.good() is not the same as bool(cin), and you should prefer the latter when checking for extraction success. The common idiom of if (cin >> var) works this way, too. –  Roger Pate Mar 16 '10 at 5:22
    
What compiler are you using? –  Mac Mar 16 '10 at 5:32
    
@Roger "bool(cin), and you should prefer": I thought, that even though function-style casts continue to be legal, the named casts were preferable. –  Alexandros Gezerlis Mar 16 '10 at 5:42
    
@Alexandros: Sometimes, but not always. Compare return some_smart_ptr<T>(new T);, return (some_smart_ptr<T>)(new T), and return static_cast<some_smart_ptr<T> >(new T);, which are all three completely equivalent. (Note that in this case some_smart_ptr has an explicit T* ctor, so return new T; isn't even an option.) However, any of those 3 will always give the same results, while cin.good() and bool(cin) can give different results. –  Roger Pate Mar 16 '10 at 5:45

1 Answer 1

That's what I'd expect too. With the compilers I have handy, the output looks like this:

function main() ..
7a
1 ..  1 7
2 ..  0 7

You may have discovered a bug in your compiler's standard library.

share|improve this answer
    
Second that output with MinGW... function main()\n 7a 1\n 1 .. 1 7\n 2 .. 0 7\n –  Mac Mar 16 '10 at 5:14
    
Not changing the value is required: 22.2.2.1.2/1 "If an error occurs, val is unchanged; otherwise it is set to the resulting value." –  Roger Pate Mar 16 '10 at 5:21

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