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Why C + +, create a Unicode file if you try to write a structure like this in the file? Part of the code:

struct stEjemplo
{
    char cadena1[9];
    char cadena2[9];
};

Write what I write in cadena1 and cadena2 shows me something like this in the file:

㈱㐳㘵㠷㠀㘷㐵㈳o

Example:

fstream file("File.dat");
if(!file.is_open())
{
    file.open("File.dat", ios::in | ios::out | ios::trunc);
}
stEjemplo somest = {0};
strcpy(somest.origen, "SomeText");
strcpy(somest.destino, "SomeText");
file.clear();
file.seekg(0,ios::beg); //ios::end if existing information
file.write(reinterpret_cast< char*>(&somest), sizeof(stEjemplo));
file.close();

Results this:

潓敭敔瑸匀浯呥硥t

Note the "t" in final (is the "t" in final of the second "SomeText")

But if my structure was:

struct stEjemplo
{
    int number; //then I assign 1324
    char cadena1[9];
    char cadena2[9];
};

Results: , SomeText SomeText or

struct stEjemplo
{
    bool x; //then I assign true o false
    char cadena1[9];
    char cadena2[9];
};

would result something like: SomeText SomeText

EDIT:

If the 00 (NULL character) in hex editor is set in odd position (starting at 0, for example: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, etc etc) I have the problem, but if the 00 is set in a pair position and is not preceded by another 00, the problem is solved.

share|improve this question
    
Why a reinterpret_cast? –  rubenvb Jul 2 '14 at 5:52
    
Similar to (char *) in C. reinterpret_cast is a c++ style cast. –  Skl Jul 2 '14 at 6:01
    
check for struct alignment and #pragma pack –  pepper_chico Jul 2 '14 at 6:02
    
the compiler is free to align members as he wishes if you don't say otherwise. –  pepper_chico Jul 2 '14 at 6:03
    
Could you give me an example? i try it but the results is the same. –  Skl Jul 2 '14 at 6:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Known Notepad bug. Not your fault.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the problem in which the characters appeared to me that way. Thanks, I had lost a whole day thinking it was my mistake. –  Skl Jul 3 '14 at 23:04

You are opening File.dat in your text editor as UTF-16LE when it quite clearly isn't, open it in plain ASCII or UTF-8 (or even use a hex editor) and you should see the strings.

潓敭敔瑸匀浯呥硥t corresponds to the UTF-16LE sequence

53 6F 6D 65 54 65 78 74 00 53 6F 6D 65 54 65 78 74 00

guess what this is when read as plain ASCII / UTF-8?

share|improve this answer
    
@user657257 Yes, buy I don't know why GCC inserts a "ff fe" at the beginning of cadena1[] If I fill all the string! Is the first time that I have a problem in that way. –  Skl Jul 2 '14 at 9:29
    
@Skl GCC isn't adding the BOM, your editor is (Notepad presumably?). Delete File.dat, run the app again, and read the file with a hex editor or a another text editor like Notepad++. –  user657267 Jul 2 '14 at 9:33
    
Yes, I'm use Notepad (Windows 7). On the other hand, I deleted all of the code that must treat the contents of the structure and the file and I've rewritten differently, certainly more orderly, and erased the file. I ran the program and now it appears: 潓敭敔瑸匀浯呥硥t (in the notepad appear rectangles), (my structure is the same). I opened it with the hex editor, grouped by bytes, and appears without BOM. But if grouped by WORDS (this agroup two bytes), appears as in Notepad (rectangles). Then opened it in Notepad++ and appears: SometextNULSometextNUL I guess the problem is already solved. Thanks. –  Skl Jul 3 '14 at 22:32

This is a bad way of handling things. It may even be undefined behavior (due to padding of the struct members).

It would be better to write serialization code for your struct:

#include <cstring>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

struct stEjemplo
{
    char cadena1[9];
    char cadena2[9];
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const stEjemplo& e)
{
  return os << e.cadena1 << ' ' << e.cadena2;
}

int main()
{
  stEjemplo somest = {};
  std::strcpy(somest.cadena1, "SomeText");
  std::strcpy(somest.cadena2, "SomeText");
  std::ofstream file("File.dat", std::ios::trunc);
  if(!file)
  {
    std::cout << "Failed opening file.\n";
  }
  file << somest;
  file.close();

  // no error checking, assuming all will go well
  std::ifstream test("File.dat");
  std::string contents;
  std::getline(test, contents);
  std::cout << contents;
}

Live demo here.

Also:

  • consider using std::string instead of char[] and strcpy.
  • consider using std::ios::binary when writing raw data like encoded strings.
share|improve this answer
    
That's right, but I carry the information of the file to vector <stExample> examples; with push_back (), work with the vector, delete or open the file with ios :: trunc, and then write the vector information in the file. Use this method with other structure and it works perfectly. –  Skl Jul 2 '14 at 7:32
    
@user3793540 the fact that the method "works" elsewhere by no means means it is otherwise correct. –  rubenvb Jul 2 '14 at 7:36
    
I opened the file in binary mode, use ifstream to read and ofstream to write the vector, and the same thing keeps happening. –  Skl Jul 2 '14 at 8:01

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