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I am making a game that needs a crosshair. I have been playing with the java.awt.cursor class and that is easy enough, but the problem is that I do not want the crosshairs to be able to leave the window I create for my game, so I tried this instead:

  private void drawCrossHair(Graphics g){
    Ellipse2D ellipse = new Ellipse2D.Float();
    ellipse.setFrame(crossHair.x, crossHair.y, 36, 36);
    Color yellow = new Color (0xEDFF62);
    g.setColor(yellow);            
    g.fillOval(crossHair.x, crossHair.y, 40, 40);
    g.setClip(ellipse);
    g.clip(ellipse);

Basically I am trying to remove the "ellipse" from "g" leaving only a small ring behind. The problem here is that "g.clip(ellipse);" gives me an error. My objective with this code is to create a circle with a transparent center, like a donut. Once the donut is created I will add some small points on the inside of it so it looks more like crosshairs. One thing that may or may not be an issue is that I plan on moving the crosshairs with a joystick, not a mouse... I do not know if that will limit my options for what kind of object my crosshairs can be.

EDIT:

Here is a SSCCE version (well almost... does not compile due to "g2 = bf.getDrawGraphics()")

package game;

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.awt.image.BufferStrategy;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import java.awt.geom.Ellipse2D;

public class Game extends JFrame {

    private int windowWidth = 1280;
    private int windowHeight = 1024;
        private Ball crossHair;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Game();
    }
    public Game() {
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        this.setSize(windowWidth, windowHeight);
        this.setResizable(false);
        this.setLocation(0,0);
        this.setVisible(true);
        this.createBufferStrategy(2);
        initGame();
        gameLoop();
    }
    private void initGame() {
            crossHair = new Ball (windowWidth/2, windowHeight/2, 3, 3);
    }

        private void gameLoop() {
            //game logic
            drawFrame();              
        }

        private void drawFrame() {

            //Setting up Double Buffering
            BufferStrategy bf = this.getBufferStrategy();
            Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)bf.getDrawGraphics();

            try {
                g2 = bf.getDrawGraphics();
                Color darkBlue = new Color(0x010040);

                g2.setColor(darkBlue);
                g2.fillRect(0, 0, windowWidth, windowHeight);

                drawCrossHair(g2);
            } finally {
                // dispose of graphic.
                g2.dispose();
            }

            // show contents of backbuffer on screen
            bf.show();

            Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().sync();
        }

        private void drawCrossHair(Graphics2D g2){
            Color yellow = new Color (0xEDFF62);
            g2.setColor(yellow);            
            g2.fillOval(crossHair.x, crossHair.y, 40, 40);
            Ellipse2D ellipse = new Ellipse2D.Float();
            ellipse.setFrame(crossHair.x, crossHair.y, 36, 36);
            g2.setClip(ellipse);
            g2.clip(ellipse);
        }  
}

And here is another class in the same package:

package game;

public class Ball {
    public int x;
    public int y;
    public int dx;
    public int dy;

    public Ball(int x, int y, int dx, int dy) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.dx = dx;
        this.dy = dy;
    }
}

EDIT 2:

Here is my latest attempt, this seems to work ok... please let me know if this is bad coding (I got the idea here):

private void drawCrossHair(Graphics g){
    Color yellow = new Color (0xEDFF62);
    g.setColor(yellow);
    for (int i = 0; i < 1; i++) {
    g.drawOval(crosshair.x + i, crosshair.y + i, 40 - i - i, 40 - i - i);
    }
    g.fillArc(crosshair.x + 10, crosshair.y + 21 , 20, 20, -45, -90);
    g.fillArc(crosshair.x - 1, crosshair.y + 10, 20, 20, -135, -90);
    g.fillArc(crosshair.x + 10, crosshair.y - 1, 20, 20, -225, -90);
    g.fillArc(crosshair.x + 21, crosshair.y + 10, 20, 20, -315, -90);
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

but the problem is that I do not want the crosshairs to be able to leave the window I create for my game,

It doesn't. The cursor gets reset when the mouse moves off the frame or component.

Again, post your SSCCE showing the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
What I meant was that the crosshairs should be captured in the window if the crosshairs are being created from the mouse (like how a virtual machine captures the mouse and will not let it leave) OR the crosshairs need to be independent of the mouse (since they are going to be controlled by a joystick). I didn't think that posting my entire code would be necessary for such a simple problem, but if you need it I will gladly provide it. –  ubiquibacon Mar 16 '10 at 6:30
    
Well, I still don't know what you are trying to do and you still haven't posted a SSCCE. The code you posted does not compile. I tried to fix it but don't know if I made any mistakes. When I run the code I simple see an empty frame with no painting. I don't know why you are use a BufferStrategy. Swing is double buffered by default. Read the section from the Swing tutorial on Custom Painting: java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/TOC.html. –  camickr Mar 17 '10 at 3:15
    
I stated that it did not compile. I used BufferStrategy because that is what the tutorial I was using said to use. I am very new at Java so I am far from knowing what should be used where and when, I just read as much as I can to get the info I need to make stuff work. I will read through the link you posted. –  ubiquibacon Mar 17 '10 at 3:43
    
I'm not going to have time to get back on this project for another couple of months. Camickr, you have helped me before so maybe when I have some more time I will post a revised edition of this question for you to ponder. Thanks for your help guys. –  ubiquibacon Apr 13 '10 at 21:26

What kind of error?

A compilation error I'm thinking because Graphics doesn't have a clip method. Graphics2D does.

You can draw a donut shape just with an ellipse and a stroke size < radius.

g.setStroke(new BasicStroke(2.0f));
g.drawOval(crossHair.x, crossHair.y, 40, 40);
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't realize there was a difference between Graphic and Graphic2D, thank you for enlightening me. So far all of my code is based on Graphics, not Graphics2D, so if I can stick with Graphics I think that would make my life easier. Is there another way I can do this with Graphics? –  ubiquibacon Mar 16 '10 at 6:10
    
As far as I'm aware, the graphics object used is always actually a Graphics2D, but is declared as Graphics due to the method signature. Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g; If you're worried about encountering a DebugGraphics or something you could do an instanceof first –  tom Mar 16 '10 at 6:16
    
I am using BufferStrategy getDrawGraphics, and that does not work with Graphics2D. Since I am a Java noob what would be the BufferStrategy getDrawGraphics equivalent in Graphics2D? –  ubiquibacon Mar 16 '10 at 6:32
    
not sure. I don't think you need the clip() method, which means you don't need Graphics2D. –  tom Mar 16 '10 at 6:54
    
Isn't the code you posted based on Graphics2D? –  ubiquibacon Mar 16 '10 at 7:08

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