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(This question is related to this one and this one, but those are pre-walking the generator, which is exactly what I want to avoid)

I would like to split a generator in chunks. The requirements are:

  • do not pad the chunks: if the number of remaining elements is less than the chunk size, the last chunk must be smaller.
  • do not walk the generator beforehand: computing the elements is expensive, and it must only be done by the consuming function, not by the chunker
  • which means, of course: do not accumulate in memory (no lists)

I have tried the following code:

def head(iterable, max=10):
    for cnt, el in enumerate(iterable):
        yield el
        if cnt >= max:
            break

def chunks(iterable, size=10):
    i = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        yield head(i, size)

# Sample generator: the real data is much more complex, and expensive to compute
els = xrange(7)

for n, chunk in enumerate(chunks(els, 3)):
    for el in chunk:
        print 'Chunk %3d, value %d' % (n, el)

And this somehow works:

Chunk   0, value 0
Chunk   0, value 1
Chunk   0, value 2
Chunk   1, value 3
Chunk   1, value 4
Chunk   1, value 5
Chunk   2, value 6
^CTraceback (most recent call last):
  File "xxxx.py", line 15, in <module>
    for el in chunk:
  File "xxxx.py", line 2, in head
    for cnt, el in enumerate(iterable):
KeyboardInterrupt

Buuuut ... it never stops (I have to press ^C) because of the while True. I would like to stop that loop whenever the generator has been consumed, but I do not know how to detect that situation. I have tried raising an Exception:

class NoMoreData(Exception):
    pass

def head(iterable, max=10):
    for cnt, el in enumerate(iterable):
        yield el
        if cnt >= max:
            break
    if cnt == 0 : raise NoMoreData()

def chunks(iterable, size=10):
    i = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        try:
            yield head(i, size)
        except NoMoreData:
            break

# Sample generator: the real data is much more complex, and expensive to compute    
els = xrange(7)

for n, chunk in enumerate(chunks(els, 2)):
    for el in chunk:
        print 'Chunk %3d, value %d' % (n, el)

But then the exception is only raised in the context of the consumer, which is not what I want (I want to keep the consumer code clean)

Chunk   0, value 0
Chunk   0, value 1
Chunk   0, value 2
Chunk   1, value 3
Chunk   1, value 4
Chunk   1, value 5
Chunk   2, value 6
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "xxxx.py", line 22, in <module>
    for el in chunk:
  File "xxxx.py", line 9, in head
    if cnt == 0 : raise NoMoreData
__main__.NoMoreData()

How can I detect that the generator is exhausted in the chunks function, without walking it?

share|improve this question
    
Don't know how to fix it, but that except will only catch the exception if it is raised when creating head, not when iterating it. –  tobias_k Jul 2 '14 at 9:08
    
@tobias_k: sure, I understand that. I am looking for a fix for that ... –  jeckyll2hide Jul 2 '14 at 9:09
    
Would it be okay to peek at the first element? You could try to next the first element, then raise an exception or return the actual chunk iterator. –  tobias_k Jul 2 '14 at 9:16
    
@tobias_k: that would be a good compromise, but not sure how to implement that without losing that element ... –  jeckyll2hide Jul 2 '14 at 9:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One way would be to peek at the first element, if any, and then create and return the actual generator.

def head(iterable, max=10):
    first = next(iterable)      # raise exception when depleted
    def head_inner():
        yield first             # yield the extracted first element
        for cnt, el in enumerate(iterable):
            yield el
            if cnt + 1 >= max:  # cnt + 1 to include first
                break
    return head_inner()

Just use this in your chunk generator and catch the StopIteration exception like you did with your custom exception.


Update: Here's another version, using itertools.islice to replace most of the head function, and a for loop. This simple for loop in fact does exactly the same thing as that unwieldy while-try-next-except-break construct in the original code, so the result is much more readable.

def chunks(iterable, size=10):
    iterator = iter(iterable)
    for first in iterator:    # stops when iterator is depleted
        def chunk():          # construct generator for next chunk
            yield first       # yield element from for loop
            for more in islice(iterator, size - 1):
                yield more    # yield more elements from the iterator
        yield chunk()         # in outer generator, yield next chunk

And we can get even shorter than that, using itertools.chain to replace the inner generator:

def chunks(iterable, size=10):
    iterator = iter(iterable)
    for first in iterator:
        yield chain([first], islice(iterator, size - 1))
share|improve this answer
    
That works! Thanks! I have the full example: if you want I can edit your answer to include it and have it as reference. –  jeckyll2hide Jul 2 '14 at 9:37
1  
@jeckyll2hide See my edit. Its now all in one much smaller and saner function. –  tobias_k Jul 2 '14 at 12:14
1  
That is a thing of beauty. –  Pokey McPokerson Jul 2 '14 at 13:23

How about using itertools.islice:

import itertools

els = iter(xrange(7))

print list(itertools.islice(els, 2))
print list(itertools.islice(els, 2))
print list(itertools.islice(els, 2))
print list(itertools.islice(els, 2))

Which gives:

[0, 1]
[2, 3]
[4, 5]
[6]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but incomplete. Where is the chunker here? –  jeckyll2hide Jul 2 '14 at 9:34
    
I've thought about islice, as well, but you'd again need some mechanism to find out when the slice is empty and stop then. –  tobias_k Jul 2 '14 at 9:35

You've said you don't wish to store things in memory, so does this mean that you can't build an intermediate list for the current chunk?

Why not traverse the generator and insert a sentinel value between chunks? The consumer (or a suitable wrapper) could ignore the sentinel:

class Sentinel(object):
    pass

def chunk(els, size):
    for i, el in enumerate(els):
        yield el
        if i > 0 and i % size == 0:
            yield Sentinel
share|improve this answer
    
I do not want to traverse the generator. I want to produce a list of generators which will walk the original generator only when the consumers decide. This way I can pass the list of chunks around for other parts of my code to consume it, without pre-walking the data (which is expensive to compute in my case) –  jeckyll2hide Jul 2 '14 at 9:51

EDIT other solution with a generator of generators

You should not do a while True in your iterator, but simply iterate through it and update the chunk number at each iteration :

def chunk(it, maxv):
    n = 0
    for i in it:
        yield n // mavx, i
        n += 1

If you want a generator of generators, you can have :

def chunk(a, maxv):
    def inner(it, maxv, l):
        l[0] = False
        for i in range(maxv):
            yield next(it)
        l[0] = True
        raise StopIteration
    it = iter(a)
    l = [True]
    while l[0] == True:
        yield inner(it, maxv, l)
    raise StopIteration

with a being an iterable.

Tests : on python 2.7 and 3.4:

for i in chunk(range(7), 3):
    print 'CHUNK'
    for a in i:
        print a

gives :

CHUNK
0
1
2
CHUNK
3
4
5
CHUNK
6

And on 2.7 :

for i in chunk(xrange(7), 3):
    print 'CHUNK'
    for a in i:
        print a

gives same result.

But BEWARE : list(chunk(range(7)) blocks on 2.7 and 3.4

share|improve this answer
    
This does not provide me with a series of chunks, but with a single iterator with an indication of the chunk it belongs too. It pre-walks the iterator, which is exactly what I want to avoid. –  jeckyll2hide Jul 2 '14 at 9:49
    
@jeckyll2hide : post updated with a generator of generators –  Serge Ballesta Jul 2 '14 at 12:43

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