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Suppose I have the following class:

class A{
  ...
  B obj;
  C obj2
  ...
}

Upon construction of an A instance, B obj would be initialized by the default constructor. But before I can construct obj and obj2, I need to do some computation in the constructor of A and then call a non-default constructor for B obj and C obj2.

It does not cost me a lot, but the call to a default constructor for B obj and C obj2 upon construction of A would be completely unnecessary.

Can I prevent C++ from calling a default constructor? Or is this the wrong approach anyways?

EDIT: For clarification, I added a second object. I have to read from a file and can then construct B and C.

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Why not just make a manual no-op ctor for B and have a member function called Initialize() that takes whatever parameters it needs and is triggered by ctor of A or other appropriate function when it is ready to setup B object? –  Adrian Lis Jul 2 at 11:58
1  
Is the construction of B dependent on data within A, i.e. other members etc. I know you say it's a calculation, but what other data is used? –  Niall Jul 2 at 12:02
1  
Going the literal way: Wrap a member in an anonymous union, and you can use that to suppress ctor / dtor / op=. –  Deduplicator Jul 2 at 12:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is the somewhat wrong approach. I would suggest something like this:

int arguments(){ //assuming obj takes an int as 3rd constructor argument, could be any
    //do computation you wanted to do in A::A
}

class A{
    A() : obj(non, Default, arguments()){}
    B obj;
}

Now the initialization is done before obj is created. You may also make arguments return a B and rely on the move constructor of B.

Edit: The answer does not change much with the edited question. Now you have two objects but the same logic applies:

class A{
    A() : obj(doInitCalculations()), obj2(something){}
    B obj;
    C obj2;
}

obj must be initialized before obj2 (even if you write A() : obj2(), obj1{}) because they are constructed in the order they are declared in the class. So doInitCalculations is still called before either object is constructed.

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If you return a B, a good compiler will even optimize out the copy/move. –  TNA Jul 2 at 12:12
    
This is a good answer. Unfortunately, I did not ask my question precise enough. As I edited, there are 2 objects. Before I can construct them, I have to read from a file. So the mentioned approach is not really feasible in my case. Sorry for the badly asked question. –  Michael Jul 2 at 12:15
    
@Michael Edited accordingly. –  nwp Jul 2 at 12:25

You may delegate your constructor, something like:

class A
{
public:
    A() : A(ComputeSomethingForBAndC()) {}

private:
    A(const DataToBuildBAndC& dataToBuildBAndC) :
        b(dataToBuildBAndC),
        c(dataToBuildBAndC)
    {}
private:
  B b;
  C c;
};
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No matter what you do, the constructor of B will be called before you enter into the body of A. If you don't specify anything in the initializer list, the default constructor will be called. If you need to calculate values first, then the only real solution would be to do so in a static member function:

class A
{
    B obj;
    static B initializeB( ... );
public:
    A( ... ) : obj( initializeB( ... ) ) {}
};

This is fine if the calculation only depends on the arguments, and is only needed for the initialization of B. Otherwise, it might require doing the same calculations twice.

If the initialization of B depends on other members, which are also calculated, then you can put the other members before obj (so they will be initialized first), and use the static member trick on them. (Just be sure to put a big comment to the effect that your code absolutely depends on the order of the members.)

Finally, if nothing else works, you can arrange for a "trivial" constructor for B, which only does the minimum so that an assignment later will work. Then you can write:

A::A()
    : obj( doNothing )
{
    //  all the calculation
    obj = B(...);
}

(For doNothing, just use an enum:

enum DoNothing { doNothing };

The provide an overload B::B( DoNothing ) in B.)

I'd consider this a last resort, as it involves modifying B, which is rather invasive. Still, I've used it one or two times in the past.

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You could use a (smart) pointer for B.

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Using dynamic memory allocation is probably much more expensive than invoking a default constructor. –  TNA Jul 2 at 11:56
    
i agree with @TNA calling the default constructor is fine. –  deW1 Jul 2 at 11:57
    
I also think I should not put it on dynamic memory for almost no reason. The empty default constructor is definitely cheaper than dynamic memory allocation. –  Michael Jul 2 at 12:09

You'll need a level of indirection, something like:

class A {
    unique_ptr<B> pObj;
public:
    A {
        // do your pre-B stuff
        pObj = std::unique_ptr<B>(new B(/* args */));
    };
    // other stuff
}
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This is only reasonable, if default construction of an B object is very expensive. –  TNA Jul 2 at 12:02

I would recommend, make your B class constructor private.. something like

class B
{
private:
    B();
}

and no one(from outside the class itself or friend classes) will be able to call default constructor. Also, then you'll have three options for using the class: either to provide a parameterized constructor, or use it as a utility class (one with static functions only), or to create a factory for this type in a friend class.

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Can I prevent C++ from calling a default constructor?

You can't if B is not an build in or an aggregate Type.

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