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I would like to perform a 'cross-difference' as follows:

cross_diff ( [a,b], [c,d] ) = [ [ a - c, a - d], [ b - c, b - d] ]

I have a routine to do this in python as follows:

def crossdiff(a,b):
    c = []
    for a1 in range(len(a)):
        for b1 in range(len(b)):
            c.append (a[a1]-b[b1])
    x = numpy.array(c)
    x.reshape(len(a),len(b))
    return x

The problem is that I have to create a python array and stuff the results into it, then convert back to a numpy array. I would like to be able to take numpy vectors a and b and get a numpy array c which contains all the differences, as the performance of the code above is poor for large vector sizes.

Is there away to perform the above calculation as "pure" numpy operations?

EDIT FOR TESTING RESULTS:

I ran all four implementations listed in this thread through the Python profiler for comparison. I had to run them on a workstation since the initial implementation uses ~4GB of RAM with 10k elements.

import numpy
import cProfile

def cross_diff(A, B):
    return A[:,None] - B[None,:]

def crossdiff2 (a,b):
    ap = numpy.tile (a, (numpy.shape(b)[0],1))
    bp = numpy.tile (b, (numpy.shape(a)[0],1))

    return ap - bp.transpose()

def crossdiff(a,b):
    c = []
    for a1 in range(len(a)):
        for b1 in range(len(b)):
            c.append (a[a1]-b[b1])
    x = numpy.array(c)
    x.reshape(len(a),len(b))
    return x

a = numpy.array(range(10000))
b = numpy.array(range(10000))

cProfile.run('crossdiff (a,b)')
cProfile.run('crossdiff2 (a,b)')
cProfile.run('cross_diff (a,b)')
cProfile.run('numpy.subtract.outer (a,b)')

Results: Original python is 74.147 seconds, my version is 1.656 seconds, 3rd implementation 0.296 and 4th 0.288.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try:

import numpy as np

np.array([a,b])[:,None] - np.array([c,d,e])[None,:]

A bit of explanation: The None in the index expands the dimension as much as needed. So, actually the calculation will be:

a a a     c d e     a-c  a-d  a-e
       -         =  
b b b     c d e     b-c  b-d  b-e

Surprisingly useful, the None in indexing.

One more example:

import numpy as np

def cross_diff(A, B):
    return A[:,None] - B[None,:]

vec_a = np.array([1,2,3,4])
vec_b = np.array([3,2,1])

print cross_diff(vec_a, vec_b)
share|improve this answer
    
the None in index is it something particular to numpy array or that can be done with any array? –  Below the Radar Jul 2 '14 at 17:12
    
@BelowtheRadar: It is a NumPy trick. Basic python arrays do not support multi-dimensional indexing or any element-wise calculations. –  DrV Jul 2 '14 at 17:14
    
I see the concept of replicating a by shape(b) and b by shape(a), but when I try this it returns an array of 1-element values, instead of n-element values. –  Guy Jul 2 '14 at 17:19
    
@Guy, did you try my example? Put some numbers instead of a,b,c,d, and e. If you have 1d-arrays A and B, try A[:,None] - B[None,:]. I added a further example to the end of my answer. –  DrV Jul 2 '14 at 17:25
    
I did try it, and i got this: code >>> np.array([1,2,3])[:,None] - np.array([1,2,3])[:,None] array([[0], [0], [0]]) code –  Guy Jul 2 '14 at 17:28

You can get the same result without the explicit dimension adding for broadcasting by using the .outer method of ufuncs. For example:

>>> np.subtract.outer([1, 2], [3, 4, 5])
array([[-2, -3, -4],
       [-1, -2, -3]])

It has the added benefit of accepting any iterable as input, you don't need to first convert them to arrays.

share|improve this answer

Based on technique outlined by @DrV, I came up with this:

def crossdiff2 (a,b):
    ap = numpy.tile (a, (numpy.shape(b)[0],1))
    bp = numpy.tile (b, (numpy.shape(a)[0],1))

    print ap.transpose()

    return ap - bp.transpose()

Which gives the same answer as above but keeps all data manipulation in numpy.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice try! But do not try to over-optimize. This is much slower (appr. x 8) compared to the trivial solution :) –  DrV Jul 2 '14 at 17:44

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