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If I have a variable in a file outside a function declared and initialized as such:

static int i = 42;

Where is the variable i stored? Is it the Data section?

If I have a variable in a file outside a function, declared but not initialized as such:

static int j;

Where is the variable j stored? Is it the BSS?

I presume that j will be initialized to zero by default, so what if I later do:

j = 1;

Where will j now be stored?

Now to the part I'm really interested in: are static file-scope variables available to all threads?

I'm asking because of course the heap is available to all threads, but each thread has its own stack and previously I had assumed that static file-scope variables are placed on the stack, just as variables declared inside a function.

Just out of curiosity - do the same storage rules for static file-scope variables also apply for global variables?

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static int i = 42; goes into data section (even if declared inside a function); static int j; goes into bss section and stays there even after being written to (.bss is like .data, just not initialized, so it does not occupy space in executable image); const static int x = 42; goes into rdata section (.rdata is like .data, just not writeable). –  rslemos Jul 2 at 21:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Now to the part I'm really interested in: are static file-scope variables available to all threads

Yes, all threads have access to the whole address space.

What is more interesting is that the objects don't need to have static storage, the way i and j do in your example. If you have an object on the stack of thread A and somehow manage to pass its address to thread B, B can access it without problems.


do the same storage rules for static file-scope variables also aply for global variables?

Both of these have what is called "static storage". In the context of a variable declared outside of any function static simply makes it invisible outside its translation unit.

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In C11, it is implementation-defined what happens if a thread attempts to access another thread's variable with automatic or thread storage duration (via a pointer). In POSIX and most practical systems, it is allowed like you say. –  jilles Jul 2 at 20:26
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@jilles Good to know, I'll have to read up on that. –  cnicutar Jul 2 at 20:28

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