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I am simply trying to convert _bstr_t into std::string..

I found a post on this issue (LINK), and did exactly as described, but it is raising exception..

This is what I did:

_bstr_t BString;
std::string STDString((char *) BString);

And I get this error:

0CxC00000005: Access violation reading location 0x00000000

Specifically, after looking at the call stack, error in iosfwd.h:

static size_t __CLRCALL_OR_CDECL length(const _Elem *_First)
    {   // find length of null-terminated string
    return (*_First == 0 ? 0
        : _CSTD strlen(_First));
    }


What is the right way to convert _bstr_t to std::string..?

Thanks

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@MooingDuck Just edited the code.. yes it is _bstr_t –  user2436815 Jul 2 '14 at 20:27
    
Note that BString probably uses UTF16 internally, and so the char* overload will use the current locale to choose a byte encoding, probably CP-1252, resulting in some characters being unable to be converted properly. –  Mooing Duck Jul 2 '14 at 20:27
1  
Either the post you linked to is full of crap, or compiling with /clr somehow makes the code in there work. A _bstr_t is a wrapper around a COM BSTR, which stores the length of the string in the first 4 bytes. So a cast is not going to do the job. Edit: Ah, I see how it works ... _bstr_t defines implicit conversion operators to char * and whcar_t *. –  Praetorian Jul 2 '14 at 20:29
    
@Praetorian Oops, I misread and retracted the close vote. Again: Possible duplicate of BSTR to std::string (std::wstring) and vice versa –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 2 '14 at 20:34
    
@πάνταῥεῖ: Every answer on that page has the same bug as this question is encountering. Since no answer on that page answers this question, I hesitate to close this as a dupe of that. Maybe once that page has a better answer. –  Mooing Duck Jul 2 '14 at 20:38

1 Answer 1

BString can hold a null value, wheras std::string cannot, so you'll have to account for this.

const char* buf = BString;
int bstrlen = BString.length();
std::string STDString( buf?buf:"", bstrlen);

Note that BString probably uses UTF16 internally, and so the char* overload will use the current locale to choose a byte encoding, probably CP-1252, resulting in some characters being unable to be converted properly.

share|improve this answer
    
No need for the initial cast in the conditional. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 2 '14 at 20:36
    
@KonradRudolph: I hadn't tested, but since it has four implicit conversions that are valid in a boolean context, I figured not having the cast would result in a "ambiguity" compiler error. –  Mooing Duck Jul 2 '14 at 20:40
    
@KonradRudolph "error C2440: '?' : cannot convert from '_bstr_t' to 'bool' Ambiguous user-defined-conversion" rextester.com/HPES3175 –  Mooing Duck Jul 2 '14 at 20:42
    
Yes, disregard me, I’m an idiot. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 2 '14 at 20:50

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