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In our project we are migrating to java 8 and we are testing the new features of it.

On my project I'm using Guava predicates and functions to filter and transform some collections using Collections2.transform and Collections2.filter.

On this migration I need to change for example guava code to java 8 changes. So, the changes I'm doing are the kind of:

List<Integer> naturals = Lists.newArrayList(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13);

Function <Integer, Integer> duplicate = new Function<Integer, Integer>(){
    @Override
    public Integer apply(Integer n)
    {
        return n * 2;
    }
};

Collection result = Collections2.transform(naturals, duplicate);

To...

List<Integer> result2 = naturals.stream()
    .map(n -> n * 2)
    .collect(Collectors.toList());

Using guava I was very confortable debugging the code since I could debug each transformation process but my concern is how to debug for example .map(n -> n*2).

Using the debugger I can see some code like:

@Hidden
@DontInline
/** Interpretively invoke this form on the given arguments. */
Object interpretWithArguments(Object... argumentValues) throws Throwable {
    if (TRACE_INTERPRETER)
        return interpretWithArgumentsTracing(argumentValues);
    checkInvocationCounter();
    assert(arityCheck(argumentValues));
    Object[] values = Arrays.copyOf(argumentValues, names.length);
    for (int i = argumentValues.length; i < values.length; i++) {
        values[i] = interpretName(names[i], values);
    }
    return (result < 0) ? null : values[result];
}

But it isn't as straighforward as Guava to debug the code, actually I couldn't find the n * 2 transformation.

Is there a way to see this transformation or a way to easy debug this code?

EDIT: I've added answer from different comments and posted answers

Thanks to Holger comment that answered my question, the approach of having lambda block allowed me to see the transformation process and debug what happened inside lambda body:

.map(
    n -> {
        Integer nr = n * 2;
        return nr;
    }
)

Thanks to Stuart Marks the approach of having method references also allowed me to debug the transformation process:

static int timesTwo(int n) {
    Integer result = n * 2;
    return result;
}
...
List<Integer> result2 = naturals.stream()
    .map(Java8Test::timesTwo)
    .collect(Collectors.toList());
...

Thanks to Marlon Bernardes answer I noticed that my Eclipse doesn't show what it should and the usage of peek() helped to display results.

share|improve this question
    
You don’t need to declare your temporary result variable as Integer. A simple int should do as well if you are mapping an int to an int –  Holger Jul 3 '14 at 17:05
    
Also i add that there is the improved debugger in IntelliJ IDEA 14. Now we can debug the Lamdas. –  Mikhail Dec 29 '14 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I usually have no problem debugging lambda expressions while using Eclipse Kepler or Intellij IDEA (using JDK8u5). Just set a breakpoint and be sure not to inspect the whole lambda expression (inspect only the lambda body).

Debugging Lambdas

Another approach is to use peek to inspect the elements of the stream:

List<Integer> naturals = Arrays.asList(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13);
naturals.stream()
    .map(n -> n * 2)
    .peek(System.out::println)
    .collect(Collectors.toList());

UPDATE:

I think you're getting confused because map is an intermediate operation - in other words: it is a lazy operation which will be executed only after a terminal operation was executed. So when you call stream.map(n -> n * 2) the lambda body isn't being executed at the moment. You need to set a breakpoint and inspect it after a terminal operation was called (collect, in this case).

Check Stream Operations for further explanations.

UPDATE 2:

Quoting Holger's comment:

What makes it tricky here is that the call to map and the lambda expression are in one line so a line breakpoint will stop on two completely unrelated actions.

Inserting a line break right after map( would allow you to set a break point for the lambda expression only. And it’s not unusual that debuggers don’t show intermediate values of a return statement. Changing the lambda to n -> { int result=n * 2; return result; } would allow you to inspect result. Again, insert line breaks appropriately when stepping line by line…

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the print screen. What version of Eclipse do you have or what did you do to get that dialog? I tried using inspect and display and get n cannot be resolved to a variable. Btw, peek is useful too but is prints all the values at once. I want to see each iteration process to check the transformation. Is it posible? –  Fede Jul 2 '14 at 22:47
    
I'm using Eclipse Kepler SR2 (with Java 8 support installed from Eclipse's marketplace). –  Marlon Bernardes Jul 2 '14 at 22:57
    
Are you using Eclipse too? Just set a breakpoint on .map line and press F8 multiple times. –  Marlon Bernardes Jul 2 '14 at 22:58
    
I'm using same Eclipse as you. I've put a breakpoint on .map but can only see n value can't see the transformation n*2. On guava I can debug the apply method and see argument value and transformation block and debug the behaviour –  Fede Jul 2 '14 at 23:13
4  
@Fede: what makes it tricky here is that the call to map and the lambda expression are in one line so a line breakpoint will stop on two completely unrelated actions. Inserting a line break right after map( would allow you to set a break point for the lambda expression only. And it’s not unusual that debuggers don’t show intermediate values of a return statement. Changing the lambda to n -> { int result=n * 2; return result; } would allow you to inspect result. Again, insert line breaks appropriately when stepping line by line… –  Holger Jul 3 '14 at 8:15

Debugging lambdas also works well with NetBeans. I'm using NetBeans 8 and JDK 8u5.

If you set a breakpoint on a line where there's a lambda, you actually will hit once when the pipeline is set up, and then once for each stream element. Using your example, the first time you hit the breakpoint will be the map() call that's setting up the stream pipeline:

first breakpoint

You can see the call stack and the local variables and parameter values for main as you'd expect. If you continue stepping, the "same" breakpoint is hit again, except this time it's within the call to the lambda:

enter image description here

Note that this time the call stack is deep within the streams machinery, and the local variables are the locals of the lambda itself, not the enclosing main method. (I've changed the values in the naturals list to make this clear.)

As Marlon Bernardes pointed out (+1), you can use peek to inspect values as they go by in the pipeline. Be careful though if you're using this from a parallel stream. The values can be printed in an unpredictable order across different threads. If you're storing values in a debugging data structure from peek, that data structure will of course have to be thread-safe.

Finally, if you're doing a lot of debugging of lambdas (especially multi-line statement lambdas), it might be preferable to extract the lambda into a named method and then refer to it using a method reference. For example,

static int timesTwo(int n) {
    return n * 2;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Integer> naturals = Arrays.asList(3247,92837,123);
    List<Integer> result =
        naturals.stream()
            .map(DebugLambda::timesTwo)
            .collect(toList());
}

This might make it easier to see what's going on while you're debugging. In addition, extracting methods this way makes it easier to unit test. If your lambda is so complicated that you need to be single-stepping through it, you probably want to have a bunch of unit tests for it anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
My problem was that I couldn't debug the lambda body but your approach of using method references helped me a lot with what I wanted. You could update your answer using Holger approach that also worked perfectly by adding { int result=n * 2; return result; } in different lines and I could accept the answer since both answer were helpful. +1 of course. –  Fede Jul 3 '14 at 15:19
    
@Fede Looks like the other answer got updated already, so no need to update mine. I hate multi-line lambdas anyway. :-) –  Stuart Marks Jul 3 '14 at 15:51
    
Yes, had to changed it since technically the question asked for lambda expressions and method references aren't lambda... although could serve for the same purpose. I'd be glad to accept your answer if you post Holger's comment. It would be fair since Holger's answered and yours helped too. –  Fede Jul 3 '14 at 15:58
    
@Stuart Marks: I prefer single line lambdas too. So usually I remove the line breaks after debugging ⟨which applies to other (ordinary) compound statements as well⟩. –  Holger Jul 3 '14 at 17:03
    
@Fede No worries. It's your prerogative as the asker to accept whichever answer you prefer. Thanks for the +1. –  Stuart Marks Jul 3 '14 at 17:22

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