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I'm trying to create a string of Javascript using q{} as such:

    my $javascript = q{
        $(function () {
            var chart;

            $(document).ready(function () {

                // Build the chart
                $(\'#container\').highcharts({
                    chart: {
                        plotBackgroundColor: null,
                        plotBorderWidth: null,
                        plotShadow: false
                    },
                    title: {
                        text: \'title\'
                    },
    };

It needs to be in segments like this, rather than complete Javascript blocks. My problem is that, since the block isn't complete, it contains open brackets '{' without closing brackets and perl is interpreting the closing bracket for q{} as a closing bracket for one of the javascript blocks. I tried using q() instead, but the same problem occurs. Can I use another character as a delimiter other than ( or { ? I also tried using qq but that resulted in the same problem, and it involves more escaping. I know I can do it without q or qq and just write individual lines, but this looks so much cleaner so I'd like to get this working and I'm sure there must be a way. Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In single-quoted literals, you must escape \ and the delimiters ({ and } in this case).

q{abc\{def\\ghi'jkl}  # Produces: abc{def\ghi'jkl

Exception: You need not escape \ if it unambiguous.

q{abc\\def}    # Produces: abc\def
q{abc\def}     # Produces: abc\def, just like previous

q{abc\\\\def}  # Produces: abc\\def
q{abc\\\def}   # Produces: abc\\def, just like previous

Exception: You need not the delimiters if you are using {}, [] or () the delimiters are balanced in the literal.

q{ foo \{ bar \{ baz \} qux \} moo }   # Produces:  foo { bar { baz } qux } moo 
q{ foo \{ bar { baz } qux \} moo }     # Same as above
q{ foo { bar { baz } qux } moo }       # Same as above

The problem is that you didn't properly escape your delimiters. You also expected \' to result in ' when it results in \'.

my $javascript = q{
    $(function () \{                          <---- Escape
        var chart;

        $(document).ready(function () \{      <---- Escape

            // Build the chart
            $('#container').highcharts({      <---- No slash for ', and
                chart: {                            optional for balanced { }
                    plotBackgroundColor: null,
                    plotBorderWidth: null,
                    plotShadow: false
                },
                title: {
                    text: 'title'
                },
};

Better yet, use a delimiter that does not appear in the text. (You'd only have to escape \\.)

my $javascript = q~
    $(function () {
        var chart;

        $(document).ready(function () {

            // Build the chart
            $('#container').highcharts({
                chart: {
                    plotBackgroundColor: null,
                    plotBorderWidth: null,
                    plotShadow: false
                },
                title: {
                    text: 'title'
                },
~;

Another option is to use a single-quoted heredoc. You need not — indeed you cannot — escape anything.

my $javascript = <<'__EOJS__';
    $(function () {
        var chart;

        $(document).ready(function () {

            // Build the chart
            $('#container').highcharts({
                chart: {
                    plotBackgroundColor: null,
                    plotBorderWidth: null,
                    plotShadow: false
                },
                title: {
                    text: 'title'
                },
__EOJS__
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Use a different delimiter like q~ ~

    my $javascript = q~
        $(function () {
            var chart;

            $(document).ready(function () {

                // Build the chart
                $('#container').highcharts({
                    chart: {
                        plotBackgroundColor: null,
                        plotBorderWidth: null,
                        plotShadow: false
                    },
                    title: {
                        text: 'title'
                    },
    ~;

Or use a heredoc:

    my $javascript = <<'END_JS';
        $(function () {
            var chart;

            $(document).ready(function () {

                // Build the chart
                $('#container').highcharts({
                    chart: {
                        plotBackgroundColor: null,
                        plotBorderWidth: null,
                        plotShadow: false
                    },
                    title: {
                        text: 'title'
                    },
END_JS

Note: I translated all \' to just ' in the above text, as they were likely an artifact from using single quotes as your delimiter originally.

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Using the heredoc works well. I tried multiple other delimiters and they didn't work...I tried ~, *, %, \, etc. Any reason why they wouldn't work? –  Ryan McClure Jul 2 at 22:39
    
If they were used like I demonstrated above q~ ~ and your actual text matched your example, then there is no reason why an alternative delimiter wouldn't work. You would want to pick a delimiter that wasn't included in your text ideally. '~` is probably the most common choice. However, if all you have is literal text, a heredoc is your best choice in my opinion. –  Miller Jul 2 at 22:42
1  
Looks like it was working, I'm using VIM and the colors change for strings, etc. and when I use a delimiter like ~ the colors change as if it was strings and variables. However when I compile, it runs correctly. Just unpleasant to look at. I think I'll stick with the heredoc. Thanks! –  Ryan McClure Jul 2 at 22:49

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