Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I want to change numbers that I pass into a subroutine, and then retain those numbers being changed, but it doesn't seem to work.

    my $A = 0;
    my $T = 0;
    my $C = 0;
    my $G = 0;   

     foreach my $bases in (keys %basereads){
          count ($bases, $A, $T, $C, $G);
    }

Here is my subroutine

    sub count {
    my $bases = shift;
    my $A = shift;
    my $T = shift;
    my $C = shift;
    my $G = shift;
            for (my $i = 0; $i < length($bases); $i++){
                    print "$bases\t";
                 if (uc(substr($bases,$i,1)) eq 'A'){
                               $A++;
                 }elsif (uc(substr($bases,$i,1)) eq 'T'){
                               $T++;
                 } elsif (uc(substr($bases,$i,1)) eq 'G'){
                               $G++;
                 } elsif (uc(substr($bases,$i,1)) eq 'C'){
                                $C++;
                 } else { next; }

           }
            print "$A\t$C\t$T\t$G\n";
    return my($bases, $A, $T, $C, $G);

    }

after the subroutine, I want to stored the altered A, C, T, G into a hashmap. When I print bases and ATCG inside the subroutine, it prints, so I know the computer is running through the subroutine, but it's not saving it, and when I try to manipulate it outside the subroutine (after I've called it), it starts from zero (what I had defined the four bases as before). I'm new to Perl, so I'm a little weary of subroutines. Could someone help?

share|improve this question

Always include use strict; and use warnings; at the top of EVERY script.

With warnings enabled, you should've gotten the following messages:

"my" variable $bases masks earlier declaration in same scope at script.pl line ...
"my" variable $A masks earlier declaration in same scope at script.pl line ...
"my" variable $T masks earlier declaration in same scope at script.pl line ...
"my" variable $C masks earlier declaration in same scope at script.pl line ...
"my" variable $G masks earlier declaration in same scope at script.pl line ...

These are caused by the my before your return statement:

return my($bases, $A, $T, $C, $G);

Correct this by simply removing the my:

return ($bases, $A, $T, $C, $G);

And then you just need to capture your returned values

($bases, $A, $T, $C, $G) = count($bases, $A, $T, $C, $G);

Given that you're new to perl, I'm sure you won't be surprised that your code could be cleaned up further though. If one uses a hash, it makes it a lot easier to count various characters in a string, as demonstrated below:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $A = 0;
my $T = 0;
my $C = 0;
my $G = 0;   

foreach my $bases (keys %basereads) {
    my %counts;
    for my $char (split //, $bases) {
        $counts{$char}++;
    }
    $A += $counts{A};
    $T += $counts{T};
    $C += $counts{C};
    $G += $counts{G};
}
share|improve this answer
1  
and a lot easier to leave them in a hash rather than four separate variables – ysth Jul 2 '14 at 23:31
1  
@ysth For sure. But in order to educate, it helps to leave at least some semblance to the original code. ;) Thanks for the edit btw. – Miller Jul 2 '14 at 23:33
    
Thank you so much worked like a charm! – user3799576 Jul 11 '14 at 21:46
    
NP. Feel free to give this solution the check mark if it answers your question. – Miller Jul 11 '14 at 21:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.