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I am looking for the best way to augment multiple javascript associative arrays.

For example the following code

a = { "one" : 1, "two" : 2 };
b = { "three" : 3 };
c = { "four" : 4, "five" : 5 };

d = Collect(a,b,c)

Should result in value of d being:

{ "one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3, "four" : 4, "five" : 5   };

What is the best way to do this?

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3  
A semantic note: despite the [] syntax, they aren't arrays at all. Order is not really guaranteed. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Mar 16 '10 at 12:44
1  
Iteration order is not guaranteed per ecma standards. But it is the way it is implemented in most browsers. (From John Resig) This behavior is explicitly left undefined by the ECMAScript specification. In ECMA-262, section 12.6.4: The mechanics of enumerating the properties ... is implementation dependent. However, specification is quite different from implementation. All modern implementations of ECMAScript iterate through object properties in the order in which they were defined. Because of this the Chrome team has deemed this to be a bug and will be fixing it. –  Juan Mendes Mar 16 '10 at 13:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This should do it:

function collect() {
  var ret = {};
  var len = arguments.length;
  for (var i=0; i<len; i++) {
    for (p in arguments[i]) {
      if (arguments[i].hasOwnProperty(p)) {
        ret[p] = arguments[i][p];
      }
    }
  }
  return ret;
}

Input:

a = { "one" : 1, "two" : 2 };
b = { "three" : 3 };
c = { "four" : 4, "five" : 5 };
d = collect(a, b, c);
console.log(d);

Output:

Object one=1 two=2  three=3 four=4 five=5
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Doesn't length lookup the size of the array at each invocation? I'm so used to writing for (var i = 0, len = array.length; i < len; ++i) that I can't remember off the top of my head why I started doing it. –  tvanfosson Mar 16 '10 at 12:47
    
Yes, that's correct. It is better performance to cache the length once. However, because the size of the arguments "array" is not likely to ever be very large, it won't really matter in this case. –  jhurshman Mar 16 '10 at 13:07
1  
No, except slightly on IE6. Accessing the length property costs the same as accessing the len variable. –  Alsciende Mar 16 '10 at 13:08
1  
@Juan I believe you are incorrect, and I did some tests to make up my mind. Caching the length is an easy myth of optimization that's been obsolete for many years, and it makes the code (slightly) less readable. Actually, caching the length sometimes slows down the browser (Safari). –  Alsciende Mar 16 '10 at 14:15
1  
Wouldn't it be better to write 'for (var p in...' instead of 'for (p in...' ? –  Hugo Dec 12 '11 at 8:55

jQuery has a nice way of doing this.

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend/

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+1 Even if you don't use jQuery's method, you could use their code to help construct your own (perhaps, more specific) implementation. –  tvanfosson Mar 16 '10 at 12:41
1  
And if you aren't using jQuery, you should be. :) –  Randal Schwartz Mar 16 '10 at 13:07
6  
@Randal: There are many perfectly good reasons for not using jQuery. –  Tim Down Mar 16 '10 at 14:24
    
Edit: d = $.extend({},a,b,c); –  BobStein-VisiBone Jul 27 '13 at 21:59
function Collect(a, b, c) {
    for (property in b)
        a[property] = b[property];

    for (property in c)
        a[property] = c[property];

    return a;
}

Notice: Existing properties in previous objects will be overwritten.

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2  
This has the side-effect that a === d at the end. That might be ok and it might not. –  tvanfosson Mar 16 '10 at 12:49

Why should the function be restricted to 3 arguments? Also, check for hasOwnProperty.

function Collect() {
    var o={};
    for(var i=0;i<arguments.length;i++) {
      var arg=arguments[i];
      if(typeof arg != "object") continue;
      for(var p in arg) {
        if(arg.hasOwnProperty(p)) o[p] = arg[p];
      }
    }
    return o;
}
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function collect(a, b, c){
    var d = {};

    for(p in a){
        d[p] = a[p];
    }
    for(p in b){
        d[p] = b[p];
    }
    for(p in c){
        d[p] = c[p];
    }

    return d;
}
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Underscore has few methods to do this;

1. _.extend(destination, *sources)

Copy all of the properties in the source objects over to the destination object, and return the destination object.

_.extend(a, _.extend(b, c));
=> {"one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3, "four" : 4, "five" : 5 }

Or

_.extend(a, b);
=> {"one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3}
_.extend(a, c);
=> {"one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3, "four" : 4, "five" : 5 }

2. _.defaults(object, *defaults)

Fill in undefined properties in object with values from the defaults objects, and return the object.

_.defaults(a, _.defaults(b, c));
=> {"one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3, "four" : 4, "five" : 5 }

Or

_.defaults(a, b);
=> {"one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3}
_.defaults(a, c);
=> {"one" : 1, "two" : 2, "three" : 3, "four" : 4, "five" : 5 }
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