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the program is still very empty and "naked" because im just trying to get the logic out of the way before I actually start making functions. For some reason, whatever my argv[1] is, it always prints "The help message". What am I missing? I have a bad feeling about that for statement, but I dont know whats wrong with it.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void help()
{
    printf("The help message\n");
    exit(1);
}

void a()
{
    printf("The a screen\n");
    exit(1);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char recognised_commands[3] = {help(), a()};
    int i;

    if (argc != 2)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "usage of sake: \"sake [option(s)]\"\nFor a full listing of all available commands type \"-help\" or \"--help\"\n\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    for (i = recognised_commands[0]; i != recognised_commands; i++)
    {
        printf(argv[1]);
    }
}

Edit 1: djikay: Fixed the -1 to 0, Ricky: How do I correct the help() and the a() to only call the one the user inputs after the program name (EX: sake -a)? I also fixed the exit(0). Thanks

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3  
Please tell me the -1 in this is a typo: recognised_commands[-1]. –  djikay Jul 3 '14 at 1:09
1  
This: char recognised_commands[3] = {help(), a()}; seems to be trying to assign the return value of help(), but the help() function doesn't return anything, it just prints a message. –  Hobo Sapiens Jul 3 '14 at 1:10
2  
There's quite some work on the for loop... –  jcaron Jul 3 '14 at 1:12
1  
Turn up your compiler error level and pay attention to what it says... you should get several errors for this code –  Matt McNabb Jul 3 '14 at 2:36

2 Answers 2

The line:

char recognised_commands[3] = {help(), a()};

causes both help and a to be called. help is called first, and it prints out the help message & exits the program.

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This must generate a compilation error, so it should not cause help to be called, etc. –  Matt McNabb Jul 3 '14 at 2:35
char recognised_commands[3] = {help(), a()};

This line is definitely your issue. help() and a() are both being called, thus exiting your program.

Why are you trying to assign those function return values there? Both of the functions are void in return type, meaning they won't return anything anyways.

On a side note, calling exit() with 0 as the argument means your program exited without errors. I'd exit with 1 if it's because of an error (or even better, EXIT_SUCCESS and EXIT_FAILURE, respectively).

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