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i am trying to find any user entered value in a array which the user has previously entered the values of. I made the following for finding which values were entered in array but cant seem to know where to insert the loop for finding user entered value for searching

ok update

i am looking for a way to find user entered value in array which the user entered before something like this if its logical

Ok 2nd Update

This is what i have been working on i am struck The entered searching value is not been found

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>

using namespace std;

void main ()
{
    int a[10], found;

    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    cout<<"enter value : ";
    cin>>a[i];
}

    cout<<"Enter Searching Value :";
    cin>>found;

    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    if(found == a[10])
{
    cout<<"Value Found";
    _getch();
}
        else if (found != a[10])
            cout<<"Value Not Found";

}

    _getch();

}
share|improve this question
    
You're reading 10 numbers and printing 10 numbers... what's the problem? – Ed S. Jul 3 '14 at 1:46
    
Your question is unclear. Is the user going to input another value which you need to find in the array? – Ben Jul 3 '14 at 1:47
    
yes The user enters 10 values first, then enters random value, which is checked if its entered previously or not and displays return as "Found value at a[5]" etc – Asad Jul 3 '14 at 1:51
    
Edit the question rather than responding to comments in a comment. It makes it easier for a future reader to find the information. – dmckee Jul 3 '14 at 1:55
    
Have you even tried? You have demonstrated that A) you know how to take input from the user, and B) you know how to write a loop. Put those together and... – Ed S. Jul 3 '14 at 1:57

Working solution

You are solving a finding problem here. You have no any suggestions where the entered value may
probably be, so you should try each one step by step. This is a common problem.

The first way to solve it is to use a loop. It isn't a good way for modern C++. But you should probably
try it for a practice.

bool has(int val, int const* arr, size_t size) {
    size_t idx = 0;
    // Iterates each element of array and checks
    // whether the one is equal to the `val`. In
    // case of meeting of `val`, the loop stops.
    while (idx < size && arr[idx] != val) ++idx;
    return idx != size;
}

The way below is more convinient. Actually, the more general form of has function is already has in C++ standart library in <algorithm> header. It is called find. It do exactly the same, but much better. Actually, there are a lot of functions solving a common problems in <algorithm> header. You have to use it anywhere you can.

bool has_(int val, int const* arr, size_t size) {
    int const* end = arr + size;
    // Now `has_` don't iterate each element and
    // checks it. It finds the `val` in range
    // between the first element of array and
    // the last.
    return std::find(arr, end, val) != end;
}

I suggest you to read the subsection "Prefer algorithm calls to handwritten loops." in section "STL: Containers" in the book "C++ Coding Standarts" by Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu to gain an intuition about why to use the <algorithm> header.

Also, you may find the reference to the <algorithm> header here.

Mistakes in your solution

Lets consider your code and discuss why you end up with error. Actually, you just made a typo.
It is the one of the reasons to use the <algorithm> header instead of handwritten loops like yours.

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>

using namespace std;

void main()
{
    int a[10], found;

    for (int i = 0; i<10; i++)
    {
        cout << "enter value : ";
        cin >> a[i];
    }

    cout << "Enter Searching Value :";
    cin >> found;

    for (int i = 0; i<10; i++)
    {
        // Look at here: you compare entered value ten times
        // with the value after the last element of array.
        if (found == a[10])
        {
            // In case that you found an entered value in array
            // you just continue the loop. You should probably
            // break it at this point. This may be achieved by
            // using the `brake` operator or the `while` loop.
            cout << "Value Found";
            _getch();
        }
        else if (found != a[10])
            cout << "Value Not Found";

    }

    _getch();

}
share|improve this answer

I think this answer will solve your problem.. :)

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>

using namespace std;

void main ()
{
    int a[10];
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        cout<<"enter value : ";
        cin>>a[i];
    }
    int random;
    cin>>random;
    int flag=0;
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
       if(a[i]==random)
       {
         flag=1;
         cout<<"Found at a["<<i<<"]"<<endl;
         break;
       }
    }
    if(flag==0)
    cout<<"element not found"<<endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your problem is that an array of integers has no clear definition between assigned and unassigned. You need a way to "flag" these integers. You could do this with a parity array of booleans, that would be flagged based on std::cin.fail(), or use int* and use NULL to flag. There's a lot of ways to do this.

std::vector<int*> a(10);
for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
  int input;
  cout<<"enter value : ";
  cin >> input;
  if(!cin.fail()) {
    a[i] = new int(input);
  }else{
    cin.clear(std::ios_base::failbit);
  }
}

Now you're able to test the vector a for NULL pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
i haven't understood vectors or boolan completely yet so i was hoping to keep the code simple – Asad Jul 3 '14 at 1:57
    
Why in the world would you use a vector of int* or dynamic memory at all? – Ed S. Jul 3 '14 at 1:58
    
@EdS he explained that in his text before his code block – M.M Jul 3 '14 at 2:23
1  
@MattMcNabb: The OP has an array of 10 int's, all of which were initialized. No sentinel value is needed. The OP just wants to figure out if a number provided later exists in the array. Also, you could simply not add failures and loop until there are 10 or just give 10 attempts. You still don't need to deal with pointers and deallocating all of them (which this example does not do BTW). – Ed S. Jul 3 '14 at 2:29
    
@EdS yeah he seems to have misread the question – M.M Jul 3 '14 at 2:31

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