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I'm doing a basic select against a view. Unfortunately the result can be slow and I'm getting timeout errors intermittently. How can I increase the timeout?

Using .NET 3.5, Sql Server 2000, Linq2Entities

I'm using the very basic query List<MyData> result = db.MyData.Where(x.Attribute == search).ToList();

Fixing the query so that it's faster on the DB side is not an option here.

Exact Error: "Timeout expired. The timeout period elapsed prior to completion of the operation or the server is not responding."

Update: I'd prefer to just change it for this one query.

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Um, why not fix the query, instead? You're probably missing an index. –  Craig Stuntz Mar 16 '10 at 13:10
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"Fixing the query so that it's faster on the DB side is not an option here." - That's why I put this line in there. That's not possible in this case. –  Russell Steen Mar 16 '10 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can set the timeout in your connection string.

Edit (new): It turns out that there are two different timeout concepts. The connection timeout is used to determine wether or not a connection can be established. The CommandTimeout property on the object context controls timeout for commands. So just set that to a high value, and it should not influence the short-running queries in any way.

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Is that the only way? I'd prefer to just change it for this one query. In other queries, I'd rather have it timeout sooner, since they are very fast and a longer run would mean a failure to connect. –  Russell Steen Mar 16 '10 at 13:07
    
@Russell Steen: I have updated my answer with another option. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Mar 16 '10 at 13:11
    
@Russell Steen: I have updated my answer again. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Mar 16 '10 at 13:17
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Example: (MyDbContextSubclass as IObjectContextAdapter).ObjectContext.CommandTimeout = 300; –  jocull Sep 3 '12 at 1:16
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Setting CommandTimeout to 0 means it will wait indefinitely for the command to complete. –  Josh Gallagher Dec 14 '12 at 23:29

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