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I have a module "B", I want to run it from a script "C", and I want to call global variables in "B", as they were in the "C" root. Another problem is if I imported sys in "B" when I run "C" it doesn't see sys

# NameError: global name 'sys' is not defined #

What shall I do?

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Looks quite hacky. May be if you give us a real example we will have ideas about how to do it in right way? –  Mihail Mar 16 '10 at 13:26
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In general, you don't want to do that. Modules are great for keeping objects in a separate namespace from your main program. –  Kirk Strauser Mar 16 '10 at 15:26
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3 Answers

When you import a module B (like import B), every line in B will be interpreted. I assume this is what you mean when you say you want to run it. To reference members in B's namespace, you can get them like:

B.something_defined_in_B.

If you wish to use sys explicitly in C, you will need to import it within C as well.

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is it in your PYTHON_PATH?

if not, in script C's init.py

import os, sys
sys.path.append('/PATH/TO/MODULE/B')

then, in module C

from B import *
something_defined_in_B()
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In C:

import B
B.loadGlobal(globals())

Where loadGlobal is a function that iterates all the variable you want as global:

def loadGlobal(g):
     g['sys'] = sys
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