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I'm working on a program that needs to take an input stream and then push that through a process and then output a new stream. This is for using a stream consisting of an xml and xsl and converting it to a pdf through wkhtmltopdf.exe and outputing the pdf as a stream. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Edit to add code and greater understanding:

Into the function I am sending a MemoryStream as parameter and I'm returning bytes[]. The current code I have looks like this but it is none functioning as I'm trying to figure out how to take the stream input, convert it and then return it again as a new stream.

code

public byte[] WKHtmlToPdf(MemoryStream inputStream)
{
        var fileName = " - ";
        _workingDirectory = ""; \\there is a directory here but contains company name
                                \\so I removed it
        _wkhtmlexe = wkhtmltopdf.exe";
        var p = new Process();

        p.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
        p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
        p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        p.StartInfo.FileName = _wkhtmlexe;
        p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = _workingDirectory;

        StreamWriter inpuStreamWriter = new StreamWriter(inputStream);
        inpuStreamWriter = p.StandardInput;
        StreamReader outpStreamReader = p.StandardOutput;

        string switches = "";
        switches += "--print-media-type ";
        switches += "--margin-top 10mm --margin-bottom 10mm --margin-right 10mm --margin-left 10mm ";
        switches += "--page-size Letter ";
        p.StartInfo.Arguments = switches + " " + inputStream + " " + fileName;
        p.Start();





        inpuStreamWriter.Write();

        //read output
        byte[] buffer = new byte[32768];
        byte[] file;
        using (var ms = inputStream)
        {
            while (true)
            {
                int read = p.StandardOutput.BaseStream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);

                if (read <= 0)
                {
                    break;
                }
                ms.Write(buffer, 0, read);
            }
            file = ms.ToArray();
        }

        // wait or exit
        p.WaitForExit(60000);

        // read the exit code, close process
        int returnCode = p.ExitCode;
        p.Close();
        return returnCode == 0 ? file : null;
    }
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1  
Any details and code and specific problems are greatly appreciated... –  Konrad Kokosa Jul 3 at 8:37
    
The specific problem is that I do not know how to use a stream as input. –  Peer Andreas Stange Jul 3 at 8:50
    
Those I/O/E streams are text streams. They're not intended for binary data. And even if they were, you have to do this using multi-threading or asynchronous I/O - the outputs must be read at all times, otherwise you can end up blocking the process. For example, you're not reading StandardError, so you would cause the process to hang if it has enough to write to Error. –  Luaan Jul 3 at 9:06

2 Answers 2

Your approach using process is partially wrong. You can create new pdf file from existing html file but you have to use two temporary file (one for html, the second for pdf output). In this scenario the work flow will be: 1) Save memoty stream as temp html file 2) run new process (without stream redirecting) - it produce new pdf file 3) Return new pdf file as stream 4) clean up temp files once you are done

or

You can use libwkhtmltox directly using PInvoke

or (the best)

You can use existing solution eg Pechkin which do all PInvoke and native cooperation with libwkhtmltox library for you: Pechkin usage

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We want to try to avoid saving the file to disk as this is a large server that will handling many requests and one person can access many files. –  Peer Andreas Stange Jul 3 at 10:14
    
than use the last proposal: Pechkin usage –  Aik Jul 3 at 11:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Figured out a way to overcome the problem

private static void GeneratePdfFromStream()
    {
        var ms = xml_and_xsl_to_html();
        File.WriteAllBytes(Constants.FilesResultHtml, ms.ToArray());

        var printer = new Printer();
        var pdfStream = printer.GeneratePdf(new StreamReader(ms, Encoding.GetEncoding(850), false));
        File.WriteAllBytes(Constants.FilesResultPdf, pdfStream.ToArray());
    }

The variable ms is a memorystream returned from the XslCompiledTransform() function. This is then passed to GeneratePdf in a streamReader with encodingpage 850. The function looks like this:

public MemoryStream GeneratePdf(StreamReader html)
    {
        html.BaseStream.Position = 0;
        var pdf = new MemoryStream();
        using (html)
        {
            Process p;
            var psi = new ProcessStartInfo
            {
                FileName = @"C:\wkhtmltopdf\wkhtmltopdf.exe",
                UseShellExecute = false,
                CreateNoWindow = true,
                RedirectStandardInput = true,
                RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                RedirectStandardError = true,
                Arguments = Switches() + "-q -n --enable-smart-shrinking " + " - -"
            };
            p = Process.Start(psi);
            try
            {
                if (p != null)
                {
                    var stdin = p.StandardInput;
                    stdin.AutoFlush = true;
                    stdin.Write(html.ReadToEnd());

                    stdin.Dispose();
                }
                CopyStream(p.StandardOutput.BaseStream, pdf);
                Console.WriteLine(  p.StandardOutput.CurrentEncoding.CodePage);
                p.StandardOutput.Close();
                pdf.Position = 0;
                p.WaitForExit(10000);
                return pdf;
            }
            catch
            {
                return null;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (p != null) p.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
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