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e.g. I have a function that can handle const T & and T && values:

template <typename T>
/* ... */ foo(const T &) {
std::cout << "const T & as arg" << std::endl;
}

template <typename T>
/* ... */ foo(T &&) {
std::cout << "T && as arg" << std::endl;
}

Is there a way that I can write a single function, that handles both types automatically? As in:

template <typename T>
/* ... */ bar(T t) {
    foo(t);
}

So that:

T a;
bar(a); // Handles as const T &
T b;
bar(std::move(b)); // Handles as T &&

Thank you!

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6  
See std::forward and universal references: stackoverflow.com/questions/3582001/advantages-of-using-forward –  Chris Drew Jul 3 '14 at 10:54
    
Do you want to allow const T c; bar(c);? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 3 '14 at 10:56
1  
Are you sure your existing functions work as you think? foo(a) and foo(std::move(b)) will call the same function. –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 3 '14 at 11:13
    
Regarding to Chris comment, note that your second overload doesn't take rvalues only, its an universal reference, so the "T && as arg" assumption is false. –  Manu343726 Jul 3 '14 at 11:16

1 Answer 1

You can use reference collapsing and std::forward to forward the argument to the foo function:

template <typename T>
/* ... */ bar(T&& t) {
    foo(std::forward<T>(t));
}

Please notice that your foo function will accept rvalues, constant lvalues and non-const lvalues. As an example, given:

const int x = 456;
int y = 123;

then:

foo(123);   // foo(T&&)
foo(x);     // foo(const T&)
foo(y);     // foo(T&&)

Live demo

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+1 because of the keyboard markdown tag ;-0 –  TemplateRex Jul 3 '14 at 14:19

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