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As one would expect, when using basic data types, Ruby seems to create a copy of the variable when assigning it to an instance variable. In other words @name in the Person class does not point to name:

class Person
  attr_reader :name

  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
  end
end

name = "Michael"
p = Person.new(name)
name = "Peter"
puts p.name
=> "Michael"

If you do the same thing with sets, this no longer holds true. The instance variable @family points to family and all changes to family affect @family:

require 'set'

class Family
  attr_reader :people

  def initialize(people)
    @people = people
  end
end

people = Set.new ['Grandfather', 'Father', 'Mother', 'Son', 'Daughter']
family = Family.new(people)
people << 'Grandmother'
puts family.people.include? 'Grandmother'
=> true

Why is a Set behaving differently? And how do I best create a copy of family? (e.g. @family = family.dup)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually...

Ruby seems to create a copy of the variable when assigning it to an instance variable

is not true in the way that you think. Behold

class Person
  attr_reader :name

  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
  end
end

name = "Michael"
p = Person.new(name)
name << " Jackson"
puts p.name
# "Michael Jackson"

Ruby is indeed a pass-by-value language, but those values are usually pointers to objects. Doing name = "Peter" doesn't affect the instance variable because you're just assigning a new pointer. If you use a method that modifies the object in-place (like <<) you do affect it because both variables store a pointer to the same object.

You are correct that the proper way to avoid this is to use dup.

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So to be on the safe side, one should usually use .dup for instance variables? –  migu Jul 3 '14 at 14:51
1  
I would say so. A big advantage of classes is encapsulation and sharing a pointer with some external variable would break that for most classes. –  Max Jul 3 '14 at 15:36

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