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I faced a problem that could be solved with the visitor pattern, and because I love reusable code I thought it might be a good idea to have some classes that already do most of the magic for me and which I could reuse later. So what I wanted was something like a Visitor class and a Visitable class, from which I can derive to prepare my deriving class for the use of the visitor pattern. I came up with this code:

template <typename ret = void>
class Visitor
{
public:
    typedef ret ReturnType;

protected:
    Visitor() {}
    ~Visitor() {}
};

template <typename BaseType>
class Visitable
{
public:
    template <typename Visitor>
    typename Visitor::ReturnType applyVisitor(Visitor& visitor)
    {
        return visitor(static_cast<BaseType*>(this));
    }

    template <typename Visitor>
    typename Visitor::ReturnType applyVisitor(Visitor& visitor) const
    {
        return visitor(static_cast<BaseType*>(this));
    }

protected:
    Visitable() {}
    ~Visitable() {}
};

template <typename VisitorType, typename VisitableType>
inline typename VisitorType::ReturnType applyVisitor(VisitorType visitor, VisitableType visitable)
{
    return visitable->applyVisitor(visitor);
}

class Base : public Visitable <Base>
{
public:
    virtual void foo() const
    {
        std::cout << "BASE" << std::endl;
    };

    std::string foobar() const
    {
        return "BASE";
    };
};

class Derived : public Base, public Visitable<Derived>
{
public:
    using Visitable<Derived>::applyVisitor;

    void foo() const
    {
        std::cout << "DERIVED" << std::endl;
    }; 

    std::string bar() const
    {
        return "DERIVED";
    };
};

struct MyVisitor : public Visitor < >
{
    template <class T>
    void operator()(T const var) const
    {
        var->foo();
    }
};

struct MyOtherVisitor : public Visitor <std::string>
{
    std::string operator()(Base * const var) const
    {
        return var->foobar();
    }

    std::string operator()(Derived * const var) const
    {
        return var->bar();
    }
};

int main(int _Argc, char* _Argv)
{
    Base *pVirtualDerived = new Derived();
    Base *pBase = new Base();
    Derived *pDerived = new Derived();

    std::cout << "Member method:" << std::endl;

    applyVisitor(MyVisitor(), pVirtualDerived);
    applyVisitor(MyVisitor(), pBase);
    applyVisitor(MyVisitor(), pDerived);

    std::cout << std::endl << "External method:" << std::endl;

    std::cout << applyVisitor(MyOtherVisitor(), pVirtualDerived) << std::endl;
    std::cout << applyVisitor(MyOtherVisitor(), pBase) << std::endl;
    std::cout << applyVisitor(MyOtherVisitor(), pDerived) << std::endl;
}

As one might already guess from the names I was inspired by boost::static_visitor and boost::variant. However, one can also notice that my implementation is flawed in two aspects:

  1. It does not suffice to just inherit from Visitable, I also need to put a using declaration into my class to resolve ambiguity for the applyVisitor method.
  2. It is not really the visitor pattern. Calling applyVisitor with a Base* that actually points to a Derived object does not call Derived::foo but Base::foo. I cannot declare applyVisitor in Visitable<T> virtual because it is a templated method. But I need the template because Visitor<T> is a template class it self and I would like to keep the generic return type for my visitors.

Long story short, can I somehow solve both problems and end up with two classes from which I simply need to derive to prepare my code for the visitor pattern?

share|improve this question
1  
does it have to be your own implementation or could you use other libraries? The Loki library has a generic implementation for Visitor. –  MatthiasB Jul 3 '14 at 13:33
1  
I was thinking whether CRTP could be a solution and found this: shanhe.me/2011/08/06/… and stackoverflow.com/a/7877397/104774 Do these help with your problem? –  stefaanv Jul 3 '14 at 13:45
    
I already use the CRTP technique here, however the example code from your link only supports fixed return types, but I want to support any return type. The other example seems to be based on the implementation of the Loki library. So I will have a look into this. –  sigy Jul 3 '14 at 15:16
    
I'm not here because of C++ but because it's a Visitor question. Here's how it was done in Java (hope this is useful): musingsofaprogrammingaddict.blogspot.ca/2009/01/… –  Fuhrmanator Jul 4 '14 at 2:09
    
@MatthiasB : Unfortunately it looks like that the constructs from the Loki library do not apply to my case. They can't handle inheritance. –  sigy Jul 8 '14 at 13:22

1 Answer 1

There are lots of things to talk about Visitor Design Patterns and C++ inheritance. In the specific case that you described, I think the solutions are:

About the first problem, since the Base class is already inheriting from Visitable, you don't need to inherit from it again in the derived class:

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    void foo() const
    {
        std::cout << "DERIVED" << std::endl;
    };
};

About the second problem, I think you just forgot the virtual keyword in the Base class:

class Base : public Visitable<Base>
{
    public:
        virtual void foo() const
        {
            std::cout << "BASE" << std::endl;
        };
};
share|improve this answer
    
My example code did not show this, so I updated it accordingly, but I think I need both classes to derive from Visitable in order for the static_cast to work (almost) probably in case I need to call different methods depending on the actual type. For this reason my example code was a bit silly because what I did there could already be done with simple polymorphism. –  sigy Jul 3 '14 at 15:11

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