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This feels like something that should already have been answered, but my search foo is failing me.

Working in Rails 3.2, suppose we have two DB tables that have sufficiently identical columns for the columns we care about in this select, like so:

create_table "current_employees" do |t|
  t.string    "first_name"
  t.string    "middle_name"
  t.string    "last_name"
  . . . more columns
end

create_table "ex_employees" do |t|
  t.string    "first_name"
  t.string    "middle_name"
  t.string    "last_name"
  . . . more columns
end

Yes, made-up example: just go with it for now.

When HR wants to look up a current or former employee, they don't want to discriminate between the two tables: they need results that could be in either table.

How do I set up my models, controller(s), etc. to get results from either table?

For example, Jack Jackson is in the current_employees table, and Jack O'Lantern is in the ex_employees table. When a search for "Jack" is performed, the results table should have two rows, one for Jack Jackson and another for Jack O'Lantern.

Updated to specify Rails 3.2.

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1  
This: CurrentEmployees.joins("Full outer join ex_employees").where("first_name like '?%'", "Jack") should work I think –  bjhaid Jul 3 at 14:54

3 Answers 3

If you don't need to make changes to the db, you could use a view that does a union of both tables and make you model from this view

class Employee < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.table_name = 'Employeeview'
  self.primary_key = 'employee_id'

  protected

  def readonly?
    true
  end
end
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You will have to execute two different queries and get all the results in single array

search_results = []
search_results += CurrentEmployee.where("name like '%Jack%'").all
search_results += ExEmployee.where("name like '%Jack%'").all

And now show all the records from the array in the view

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Without knowing which version of Rails you're using, you can use Arel to generate the SQL query for an outer join, e.g.:

Arel::Table.new(:current_employees).join(Arel::Table.new(:ex_employees), Arel::Nodes::OuterJoin).on(Arel::Table.new(:current_employees)[:first_name].eq(Arel::Table.new(:ex_employees)[:first_name]))

which generate the following SQL query:

irb(main):001:0> Arel::Table.new(:current_employees).join(Arel::Table.new(:ex_employees), Arel::Nodes::OuterJoin).on(Arel::Table.new(:current_employees)[:first_name].eq(Arel::Table.new(:ex_employees)[:first_name])).to_sql
=> "SELECT FROM \"current_employees\" LEFT OUTER JOIN \"ex_employees\" ON \"current_employees\".\"first_name\" = \"ex_employees\".\"first_name\""
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1  
Good point. Updating question to specify that I'm on Rails 3.19. –  Daniel Ashton Jul 3 at 14:06

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