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class A  
{  
private:  
        int a,b,c;  
public:
        virtual int get()=0;
         friend class B;
};

class B{
//here I want to access private variables of class A that is a, b and c
};

class C:public class A
{  
        int get(){    
       //some code  
        }  
};

How to access private members of class A in class B. I cannot create an object of class A since it is abstract. I somehow have to use an object of class C to do that but how?

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Have you tried anything yet? –  Brian Jul 3 '14 at 14:01
    
I am stuck. If I create an object of class C inside class B then it cannot access the private members of class A. –  PuRaK Jul 3 '14 at 14:03
    
Can you show an example? –  Brian Jul 3 '14 at 14:04
1  
Show the real code with errors –  Wojtek Surowka Jul 3 '14 at 14:04
    
@PuRaK ' If I create an object of class C inside class B ...' So why are you wondering about this? Only B was declared as friend, not C. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 3 '14 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
class A {
    friend class B;
private:
    int x;
public:
    A() : x(42) {}
};

class C : public A {
};

class B {
public:
    int reveal_secrets(C &instance){
        // access private member
        return instance.x;
    }

    int reveal_secrets(){
        // access private member of instance created inside B
        C instance;
        return instance.x;
    }
};

void print_secrets(){
    C instance;
    B accessor;
    std::cout << accessor.reveal_secrets(instance) << ", " << accessor.reveal_secrets() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Incidentally never use virtual without making a virtual destructor. That is item 7 in Scott Meyers' book "Effective C++" which I found very helpful early on. –  Kenny Ostrom Jul 3 '14 at 14:39
    
I meant to type some commentary. If you make A abstract, it changes nothing in this code. Since A is abstract, you must create C (which is A). Then B can access the A part of C. –  Kenny Ostrom Jul 3 '14 at 14:50

class B will have to have an instance object to work with in the first place. That instance object is what B will look at in order to access a, b, etc .

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class B does have an instance object to work with, of type C. –  n.m. Jul 3 '14 at 14:13
    
But the problem is that instance object cannot access the private members of class A. I have to somehow access them in class B. Is there any possible way of doing that in this situation? –  PuRaK Jul 3 '14 at 14:15
    
@PuRaK if that object of type C is called obj, in B simply use obj.a, obj.b, etc –  Paul Evans Jul 3 '14 at 14:28
    
@PuRaK No, the problem is you not telling what errors you are getting. Because you should not be getting any. –  n.m. Jul 3 '14 at 14:28

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