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I am trying to call a method that passes an object called parameters.

public void LoadingDataLockFunctionalityTest()
{
    DataCache_Accessor target = DataCacheTest.getNewDataCacheInstance();
    target.itemsLoading.Add("WebFx.Caching.TestDataRetrieverFactorytestsync", true);

    DataParameters parameters = new DataParameters("WebFx.Core",
        "WebFx.Caching.TestDataRetrieverFactory",
        "testsync");

    parameters.CachingStrategy = CachingStrategy.TimerDontWait;
    parameters.CacheDuration = 0;
    string data = (string)target.performGetForTimerDontWaitStrategy(parameters);
    TestSyncDataRetriever.SimulateLoadingForFiveSeconds = true;
    Thread t1 = new Thread(delegate()
    {
        string s = (string)target.performGetForTimerDontWaitStrategy(parameters);
        Console.WriteLine(s ?? String.Empty);
    });
    t1.Start();
    t1.Join();

    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    ReaderWriterLockSlim rw = DataCache_Accessor.GetLoadingLock(parameters);

    Assert.IsTrue(rw.IsWriteLockHeld);
    Assert.IsNotNull(data);
}

My test is failing all the time, and I am not able step through the method.

Can someone please put me in the right direction?

share|improve this question
    
Well, it'd be helpful if you would post your test code, and also tell us what error message you see when the test fails. –  razlebe Mar 16 '10 at 15:47
1  
You would have to paste your production code as well, e.g. DataCache_Accessor class and performGetForTimerDontWaitStrategy method –  Grzenio Mar 16 '10 at 17:04
1  
Remember that the Assert.IsTrue(), Assert.InNotNull() are throwing exceptions when their asserts fail. Unit tests fail when an exception is being thrown, which may not be exceptions thrown by the Assert methods. We need to know which exception is being thrown in order to help you. Your test has many dependencies and many moving parts. And the "sleep(1000)" is not something that you'd want in unit test code. If you have 100 tests like this, then you'd can not possibly hope to run through them in short cycles, which sort of is the point of TDD. –  Tormod Mar 19 '10 at 8:04

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