Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'd like to write a unit test to verify that optimistic locking is properly set up (using Spring and Hibernate).

I'd like to have the test class extend Spring's AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests.

What I want to end up with is a method like this:


@Test (expected = StaleObjectStateException.class) 
public void testOptimisticLocking() {
    A a = getCurrentSession().load(A.class, 1);
    a.setVersion(a.getVersion()-1);
    getCurrentSession().saveOrUpdate(a);
    getCurrentSession().flush();           
    fail("Optimistic locking does not work");
}

This test fails. What do you recommend as a best practice?

The reason I am trying to do this is that I want to transfer the version to the client (using a DTO). I want to prove that when the DTO is sent back to the server and merged with a freshly loaded entity, saving that entity will fail if it's been updated by somebody else in the meantime.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems that it simply isn't an option to transfer all the fields from a DTO (including version) to a freshly loaded entity, try to save it, and get an exception in case the entity was modified while the DTO was being modified on the client.

The reason for that is that Hibernate simply doesn't care what you do to the version field, given that you're working in the same session. The value of the version field is remembered by the session.

A simple proof of that:


@Test (expected = StaleObjectStateException.class) 
public void testOptimisticLocking() {
    A a = getCurrentSession().load(A.class, 1);
    getCurrentSession().evict(a); //comment this out and the test fails
    a.setVersion(a.getVersion()-1);
    getCurrentSession().saveOrUpdate(a);
    getCurrentSession().flush();           
    fail("Optimistic locking does not work");
}

Thanks everyone for help anyway!

share|improve this answer
    
Yep This works! thanks –  ido flax Jan 9 at 14:59

The bit your missing here is

A a1 = getCurrentSession().load(A.class, 1);
A a2 = getCurrentSession().load(A.class, 1);    

System.out.println("the following is true!! " + a1 == a2) ;

Hibernate will return the same instance for the same class/id for the same session.

In order to test the optimistic locking try some thing like:

A a1 = getCurrentSession().load(A.class, 1);

// update the version number in the db using some sql.
runSql("update A set version = version + 1 where id = 1");

// change object
a1.setField1("Thing");

getCurrentSession().flush(); // bang should get exception here
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer (+1), this will test optimistic locking. I'm gonna try to update the question though to fully reflect what I'm trying to achieve. –  Michal Bachman Mar 16 '10 at 16:42
    
no problems... will have a bit later once I'm not a work... already spent too much time on SO today :) –  Gareth Davis Mar 16 '10 at 17:48

With an AbstractTransactionalDataSourceSpringContextTests, you would do it like this (code taken from this thread):

public void testStatelessDetectedOnObjectWithOptimisticLocking () {
    long id = 1l;
    CoffeeMachine cm1 = (CoffeeMachine) hibernateTemplate.get(CoffeeMachine.class, id);
    Session firstSession = hibernateTemplate.getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession();

    endTransaction();

    // Change outside session
    cm1.setManufacturerName("And now for something completely different");

    startNewTransaction();
    Session secondSession = hibernateTemplate.getSessionFactory().getCurrentSe ssion();
    assertNotSame(firstSession, secondSession);

    CoffeeMachine cm2 = (CoffeeMachine) hibernateTemplate.get(CoffeeMachine.class, id);
    cm2.setManufacturerName("Ha ha! Changed by someone else first. Beat you!");

    hibernateTemplate.flush();

    try {
        hibernateTemplate.merge(cm1);
        fail("Stateless should be detected");
    }
    catch (OptimisticLockingFailureException ex) {
    // OK
    }
}

Note the use of startNewTransaction() (that's the key here).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I've seen this but AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests does not have the transaction methods... –  Michal Bachman Mar 17 '10 at 9:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.