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A really annoying problem. I want to check:

Set<String> set1 ;
Set<String> set2 ;
.
.
.
if(set1.equals(set2)){
 //dosomething
}
else{
 //do something else
}

however this equality doesn't ignore the cases of the string. Is there some other way of doing that?

share|improve this question
    
I think we need a little more info. A String can only appear once in a Set<String>. But is it possible, in your application, for two strings, s1 and s2, to both be in a set if s1.equalsIgnoreCase(s2) is true? If so, then what's the criteria for two sets being equal if one set does contain two or more equivalent strings? I think the solution is going to depend on nuances like that. –  ajb Jul 3 '14 at 16:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Alternatively you can use TreeSet.

public static void main(String[] args){
    Set<String> s1 = new TreeSet<String>(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);
    s1.addAll(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"a", "b", "c"}));

    Set<String> s2 = new TreeSet<String>(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);
    s2.addAll(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"A", "B", "C"}));

    System.out.println(s1.equals(s2));
}
share|improve this answer

Unfortunately, Java does not let you supply an external "equality comparer": when you use strings, HashSet uses only built-in hashCode and equals.

You can work around this problem by populating an auxiliary HashSet<String> with strings converted to a specific (i.e. upper or lower) case, and then checking the equality on it, like this:

boolean eq = set1.size() == set2.size();
if (eq) {
    Set<String> aux = new HashSet<String>();
    for (String s : set1) {
        aux.add(s.toUpperCase());
    }
    for (String s : set2) {
        if (!aux.contains(s.toUpperCase())) {
            eq = false;
            break;
        }
    }
}
if (eq) {
    // The sets are equal ignoring the case
}
share|improve this answer
    
Based on something I started looking into some time ago (but didn't quite finish): I believe that solutions that involve normalizing the strings (such as toUpperCase) work if the letters in the Strings are all in the A-Z or a-z range, or all in the Latin-1 set (0-255). But if the letters may include all letters in the Unicode set, there are some letters that, I believe, screw up attempts at a simple normalization function. –  ajb Jul 3 '14 at 16:22

Untested, but this is the general idea:

public boolean setEqualsIgnoreCase(Set<String> a, Set<String>b)
{
    if (a.size() != b.size()) return false;
    Iterator<String> ai = a.iterator();
    Iterator<String> bi = b.iterator();
    while(ai.hasNext())
    {
         if (!ai.next().equalsIgnoreCase(bi.next())) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Not that I know of.

The best solution I can see, albeit over-engineered, would be to create your custom holder class holding a String instance field (String is final and cannot be inherited).

You can then override equals / hashCode wherein for two String properties equalsIgnoreCase across two instances, equals would return trueand hashCodes would be equal.

This implies:

  • hashCode returns a hash code based on a lower (or upper) cased property's hash code.
  • equals is based on equalsIgnoreCase

    class MyString {
        String s;
    
        MyString(String s) {
            this.s = s;
        }
        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            final int prime = 31;
            int result = 1;
            result = prime * result + ((s == null) ? 0 : s.toLowerCase().hashCode());
            return result;
        }
    
        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                return true;
            if (obj == null)
                return false;
            if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
                return false;
            MyString other = (MyString) obj;
            if (s == null) {
                if (other.s != null)
                    return false;
            }
            else if (!s.equalsIgnoreCase(other.s))
                return false;
            return true;
        }
    
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
            Set<MyString> set0 = new HashSet<MyString>(
                Arrays.asList(new MyString[]
                    {
                        new MyString("FOO"), new MyString("BAR")
                    }
                )
            );
            Set<MyString> set1 = new HashSet<MyString>(
                Arrays.asList(new MyString[]
                    {
                        new MyString("foo"), new MyString("bar")
                    }
                )
            );
            System.out.println(set0.equals(set1));
     }
    

Output

true

... as said, over-engineered (but working).

share|improve this answer
    
many thanks, your solution indeed works. someone just posted this interesting page and then removed [This Link].(stackoverflow.com/questions/12214576/…). This will do me too. –  nafas Jul 3 '14 at 16:17
    
@nafas you're welcome. The linked solution actually looks much better than mine :) –  Mena Jul 3 '14 at 16:18

I would build something like this (in some form of Java pseudo code):

Set<String> set1;
Set<String> set2;

if (set1.size() != set2.size()) {
  return NOT_EQUAL;
} else {
  Set<String> set3 = new HashSet<String>();
  for (String s: set1) set3.add(s.toUpperCase());
  for (String s: set2) set3.add(s.toUpperCase());
  return set1.size() == set3.size() ? EQUAL : NOT_EQUAL;
}
share|improve this answer

You can use a loop and equalsIgnoreCase

testString.equalsIgnoreCase()
share|improve this answer
2  
the question is about comparing Set<String>, while you're referring to a method of String. These are not interchangeable, but I guess you could turn it into a proper answer by adding a loop around. –  xaizek Jul 4 '14 at 19:27
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Barnee Jul 7 '14 at 11:26

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