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I have a managed C++ dll which contains the following

public value struct StructOuter
{
   public:
      int m_int_InStructOuter;
};

public ref class ClassContainingStruct : MyBase
{
   public:
          StructOuter^ m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct;
};

From a "C#" application, I am trying to access the following of the managed DLL: I receive the base class type object which i am converting to derived class object as follows.

ClassContainingStruct  ccs = (ClassContainingStruct)base;

When I try to print the contents of ccs, ccs.m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct is shown to me as ValueType by the Intellisense. Which is true, but if try to access the contents of ValueType, i.e. m_int_InStructOuter i.e. ccs.m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct.m_int_InStructOuter the following error is reported during compilation:

Error 1 'System.ValueType' does not contain a definition for 'm_int_InStructOuter' and no extension method 'm_int_InStructOuter' accepting a first argument of type 'System.ValueType' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

When I try go to definition on the C# application for the ClassContainingStruct class it is defined as follows(as per Metadata):

public class ClassContainingStruct : MyBase
{
        public ValueType m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct;
        ....
        [HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions]
        protected override void Dispose(bool value);
}
  1. Why it is mentioned as ValueType instead of StructOuter type
  2. Why i am getting a compilation error when I try to access ccs.m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct.m_int_InStructOuter
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You did not declare it properly. Variables of a value types should not be declared with the ^ hat. That creates a value type value that is always boxed. Not something that C# understands, it has no equivalent syntax, it can only map it to System.ValueType. Only use the hat on reference types. You also forgot to declare the variable public. Fix:

public ref class ClassContainingStruct : MyBase
{
public:
   StructOuter m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct;   // Note: no hat
};

As in C#, you ought to favor a property accessor instead.

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#Added public now. Thanks! I thought hat ^ can be used as a notion to mention that it is a pointer to Value Type, instead of reference Type. Is this not true? Is there a way to specify pointer to Value Type? –  user3562972 Jul 4 at 6:35
    
No, the ^ hat designates a reference to an object that's stored on the garbage collected heap. Its lifetime is automatically managed by the GC. The StructOuter value is already stored on the heap because its container, ClassContainingStruct, is a reference type. Making it a pointer is technically possible, you have to declare it StructOuter*. But it is dangerous and many .NET languages cannot use it. It is your job to manage the pointer, you must have a destructor and a finalizer to deallocate the memory. Very unlikely that this is what you want. –  Hans Passant Jul 4 at 6:44

I think you should remove the ^ like so:

public ref class ClassContainingStruct : MyBase
{
   StructOuter m_strucOuter_InClassContainingStruct;
};

That way it will part of the class instead of just having a reference to the struct.

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