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I have two dates in format YYYY-MM-DD HH:MI:SS. I want to calculate the difference between the two dates and add it to another date which is also in above mentioned format. Please suggest me a solution.

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closed as off-topic by keyser, Matt Johnson, T.C., Jongware, nullability Jul 3 '14 at 19:52

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5  
Did you try something? –  morgul Jul 3 '14 at 18:31
    
You should read how to ask questions and improve your question by adding what you've already tried. –  Sebastian Zartner Jul 3 '14 at 19:35

1 Answer 1

Here is an example how to do it:

var date1 = "2014-06-01 14:00:00";
var date2 = "2014-06-02 14:00:00";

date1 = new Date(date1.replace(' ', 'T'));
date2 = new Date(date2.replace(' ', 'T'));

var diff = Math.abs(date2.getTime() - date1.getTime());
console.log(diff);

The value of diff will be the difference between the two dates in milliseconds.

The replace(' ', 'T') part is needed because Firefox can't parse 2014-05-03 14:00:00 (it returns NaN). So the value needs to be converted to 2014-05-03T14:00:00 before passing it to new Date().

Edit: To add this difference to a third date, you can use the getTime() and setTime() functions:

var date3 = "2014-06-03 14:00:00";

date3 = new Date(date3.replace(' ', 'T'));
date3.setTime(date3.getTime() + diff);

console.log(date3);

See it on JSFiddle.

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The interesting thing is, you don't need date.getTime(). date-1+1 will get you the epoch. Putting it together, you could create this horrible code: new Date(date3-1+1+(date2-date1)). I assume that they are used in correct order so I don't need Math.abs. This works in current Chrome and Firefox. :) –  Artjom B. Jul 3 '14 at 18:45

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