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I'm working on a really small splash page that only has two links and a large centered background with some centered text. The text is also part of the image. The links are absolute positioned in a relative positioned container.

The links are positioned fine on screens larger than 1024px which is the size of the container. As soon as the screen gets smaller the position of the links are not in the right place anymore. This because they are related to the container and not the browser window.

This site shouldn't be responsive but it would be nice if the links are still positioned in the right place even when the window gets smaller. Is this even possible or is my current approach not the tight one?

You can see the page at the following link: http://nionwebdesign.com/dev/physical The links on the page are the Facebook link and the logo right at the bottom.

The current markup:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>      
</head>
<body>

<div class="container">

<a class="facebook" href="#"><img src="img/facebook.png"></a>
<a class="logo" href="#"><img src="img/logo-intime.png"></a>

</div>
</body>
</html>

The current css:

body{
background: #000 url('img/bg-leeg.jpg') no-repeat center top;
min-height: 900px;
}

.container{
width: 1024px;
margin: 0 auto;
position: relative;
}

.facebook{
position: absolute;
top: 628px;
right: 62px;
}

.logo{
position: absolute;
top: 778px;
right: 20px;
 }
share|improve this question
    
Don't use px values for the absolute positioning, use percentages and it will become a little more responsive. – Paulie_D Jul 3 '14 at 21:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The links to Facebook and the logo can be placed outside the container. Like that, they don't depend on the container's position (which can't be always in the middle) the way you set it up.

I've placed the links outside the container (before or after doesn't matter), then given them new positions (don't worry, they are exacly the same, just recalculated!)

My code:

HTML

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="container"></div>
    <a class="facebook" href="#"><img src="img/facebook.png"></a>
    <a class="logo" href="#"><img src="img/logo-intime.png"></a>
  </body>
</html>

CSS

body{
    background: #000 url('img/bg-leeg.jpg') no-repeat center top;
    min-height: 900px;
}

.container{
    width: 1024px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    position: relative;
}

.facebook{
    position: absolute;
    top: 628px;
    left: calc(50% + 192px);
}

.logo{
    position: absolute;
    top: 778px;
    left: calc(50% + 351px);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Gust that does the trick. You've melted my brain though as I have to figure out how and why it works this way ;-) – NielsPilon Jul 4 '14 at 6:54
    
I can give a brief explanation. The problem was that the positioning of these two objects depended on where the container was. Your container did have a margin of 0 auto, yeah, but a width of 1024px. When the browser window got smaller than these 1024px, the container would not stay in the middle, but stick to the right, since 0 auto only ADDS margin to the left and right side, and never takes margin (going below 0). So to solve this, I decided not to use the container as lead, but the left side of the window. giving it 50% first, so it stays focussed on the middle, then shifting to the right. – Gust van de Wal Jul 4 '14 at 11:48

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