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So I'm trying to go through K&R right now, and I'm SO confused at what's going on here. In the for loop line where I'm adding the spaces, the modulus operation is calculated correctly. It runs the right amount of times. BUT assigning the exact same modulus operation to spaces_to_add is returning the wrong result. (Usually stores i_new_str itself.)

Any ideas as to why this would be happening?

// replaces tabs with spaces up until next tab stop
void detab(char str[]) {
        char new_str[STR_LEN], c;
        int i, j, i_new_str, spaces_to_add;
        i_new_str = 0;
        while((c = str[i++])) {
                if(c == '\t') {
                        spaces_to_add = i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB;
                        printf("%d\n", spaces_to_add);
                        for(j = 0; j < (i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB); ++j) {
                                printf("Adding space\n");
                                new_str[i_new_str++] = ' ';
                        }           
                } else {    
                        new_str[i_new_str++] = c;
                }           
        }           

        for(i = 0; new_str[i]; ++i) {
                str[i] = new_str[i];
        }           
        str[i] = '\0';

        printf("str changed to length %d\n", i);
}

Here's some example output with some code that's not posted above:

a   b   c
Input was:
a   b   c
Length of input: 5

spaces_to_add = 1 (1 % 8)
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
spaces_to_add = 1 (9 % 8)
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
Adding space
str changed to length 17
Detabbed str:
a       b       c
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closed as off-topic by Shafik Yaghmour, EdChum, Andy Jones, Achrome, Soner Gönül Jul 4 '14 at 13:45

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – EdChum, Andy Jones, Achrome, Soner Gönül
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Note that your loop on j will run for SPACES_FOR_TAB - spaces_to_add. Think of i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB as how many char positions past last tabstop, while your for loop on j counts how many char positions for next tabstop. –  rslemos Jul 3 '14 at 23:56
    
Actually don't. Wait a minute. Just drop the j. Change it to a while (i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB) { ... i_new_str++ ... }. Or do { ... } while (...) for at least one space. –  rslemos Jul 3 '14 at 23:57
    
@rslemos Wow. I hadn't even realized I was incrementing i_new_str which is why I was being thrown off. I wasn't thinking about the logic correctly anyways, though, so thank you for explaining! And that while definitely looks like better programming style, thank you much!! –  Bitani Jul 4 '14 at 0:01
    
Changed my comment to an answer, so this question is not left unanswered. –  rslemos Jul 4 '14 at 0:16

2 Answers 2

The expression (i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB) in loop gets evaluated at every iteration, whereas the assignment is evaluated only once before the loop.

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From the problem description (complete spaces until the next tabstop), note that you should compute how many spaces to next tabstop (not how many past the last tabstop).

That is

SPACES_FOR_TAB - i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB

(and not your i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB).

That said, look at your for loop (over j): it counts j until i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB, changing i_new_str altogether.

Either you compute your limit before counting, or don't count at all:

while (i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB) {
    printf("Adding space\n");
    new_str[i_new_str++] = ' ';
}

Note that the above solution would miss the first loop in case the tab being processed is exactly on a tabstop. To add a mandatory space:

do {
    printf("Adding space\n");
    new_str[i_new_str++] = ' ';
} while (i_new_str % SPACES_FOR_TAB);
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