Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

1.)I have a large amount of data that I read from the database (about 10million records). 2.)For each record, I search and replace about 500 regular expressions that I have. 3.) After applying all 500 regular expressions the record is then written to a file and then the next record is processed.

The performance bottleneck is applying the 500 regular expressions on each and every record fetched from the database.

Here is the relevant code block:

#normalizing the addresses fetched... this may take awhile
    while(my @row = $queryHandle->fetchrow_array())
    {
        #extract data from record
        $accountKey = @row[0];
        $addressLine1 = @row[1];
        $addressLine2 = @row[2];

        #iterate through all the regular expressions I have stored (about 500)
        for my $regexRef (@regexesList)
        {
            #get regular expression hash object
            my %regexObj = %{$regexRef};
            my $regexPattern = $regexObj{pattern}; #the regex pattern
            my $regexOutput = $regexObj{output}; #the replacement string

            #first remove all special characters leaving only numbers and alphabets
            $addressLine1 =~ s/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]//g;
            $addressLine2 =~ s/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]//g;

            #now standardize the addresses
            $addressLine1 =~ s/$regexPattern/$regexOutput/ig;
            $addressLine2 =~ s/$regexPattern/$regexOutput/ig;
        }

        my $normalizedAddress = lc($addressLine1 . $addressLine2);
        $normalizedAddress =~ s/\s+//g; #remove all white space

        print $dataFileHandle "${normalizedAddress}\n";
        $rowCount++;
    }

This is working code but the performance is abysmal. Currently the script has been running for 2.5hours and has written out 3.13 million records to the output file with about 7million to go haha.

Is this the best it can get? Is there another faster, or less slower way? Maybe writing each row to a file first and then run each regular expression on the whole file?

I would like to know if there is better way to implement this before I try the above mentioned alternative

Thanks all!!

share|improve this question
1  
Go to codereview and explain exactly what you are trying to do and why you need to apply 500 regex. –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jul 4 '14 at 0:43
    
This is for standardizing user addresses such as St., str., street, road, rd., drive, dr. and so on. The full list on USPS postal addressing standards is close to 600. –  Mos No Jul 4 '14 at 0:53
    
The USPS has an API for that. –  friedo Jul 4 '14 at 0:56
    
@friedo The address verification of that API requires approval and I am short on time =( –  Mos No Jul 4 '14 at 1:10
2  
Minor suggestion: tr/A-Za-z0-9//dc will be faster than s/[^A-Za-z0-9]//g. –  Slade Jul 4 '14 at 2:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're reparsing your 500-600 regular expressions each time, and that takes time.

    $addressLine1 =~ s/$regexPattern/$regexOutput/ig; # Interpolate and reparse

The following is a proof of concept that builds an anonymous subroutine that includes your regular expressions in literal code, instead of being interpreted from variables each time.

This demonstrates a 10 fold improvement in performance.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark;

my @regexesList = map {{pattern => "foo$_", output => "bar$_"}} (1..600);

my $string1 = 'a' x 100;
my $string2 = 'b' x 100;

# Original code
sub original {
    my ($regexesList, $addressLine1, $addressLine2) = @_;

    #iterate through all the regular expressions I have stored (about 500)
    for my $regexRef (@regexesList) {
        #get regular expression hash object
        my %regexObj = %{$regexRef};
        my $regexPattern = $regexObj{pattern}; #the regex pattern
        my $regexOutput = $regexObj{output}; #the replacement string

        #now standardize the addresses
        $addressLine1 =~ s/$regexPattern/$regexOutput/ig;
        $addressLine2 =~ s/$regexPattern/$regexOutput/ig;
    }

    my $normalizedAddress = lc($addressLine1 . $addressLine2);
    $normalizedAddress =~ s{\s+}{}g; #remove all white space

    return $normalizedAddress;
}

# Build an anonymous subroutine to do all of the regex translations:
my $regex_code = "s/\\s+//g;\n";
for (@regexesList) {
    $regex_code .= "s/$_->{pattern}/$_->{output}/ig;\n";
}
my $code = <<"END_CODE";
    sub {
        my \@address = \@_;
        for (\@address) {
            $regex_code
        }
        return lc join '', \@address;
     }
END_CODE
my $address_sub = eval $code;
if ($@) {
    die "Invalid code $code: $@";
}

# Benchmark these two calling methods:
timethese(10000, {
    'original' => sub { original(\@regexesList, $string1, $string2) },
    'cached'   => sub { $address_sub->($string1, $string2) },
});

Outputs:

Benchmark: timing 10000 iterations of cached, original...
    cached:  4 wallclock secs ( 4.23 usr +  0.00 sys =  4.23 CPU) @ 2365.74/s (n=10000)
  original: 47 wallclock secs (47.18 usr +  0.00 sys = 47.18 CPU) @ 211.98/s (n=10000)

Additionally, you were needlessly applying this regex s/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]//g; for each iteration of your loop. That was unnecessary, and could've been applied outside the loop.

There are likely other improvements that can be made, but you'll have to utilize Benchmarking yourself to find them, as that's not really the purpose of SO.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for tips! I am a newbie in Perl and one line that has got me stump is inside the anonymous subroutine how is $regex_code being applied to \@address in the for loop? Pardon the noob question –  Mos No Jul 4 '14 at 2:24
    
You can print out the value of $code to see the anonymous subroutine that I built in its entirety. It uses a loop for (@address) that assigns each address line to the global variable $_. Then each regex substitution s/.../.../ig works on $_ by default. –  Miller Jul 4 '14 at 2:32
    
ah, i did not know the regex was working on $_ by default even though $_ is not written in the code block. thanks a lot! looks like i have some more reading to do on perl –  Mos No Jul 4 '14 at 2:50

For one thing, you're doing a lot of unnecessary ref and deref. So you have a list of regexes in @regexesList, which is obviously filled with hashrefs. On each hashref as you iterate, you deref it, which makes a copy of it in memory, then you pull out items in the copied hash.

So, first piece of advice, stop doing that. That alone abbreviates the for loop in your code to this:

for my $regexRef (@regexesList)
{
    #first remove all special characters leaving only numbers and alphabets
    $addressLine1 =~ s/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]//g;
    $addressLine2 =~ s/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]//g;

    #now standardize the addresses
    $addressLine1 =~ s/$regexRef->{pattern}/$regexRef->{output}/ig;
    $addressLine2 =~ s/$regexRef->{pattern}/$regexRef->{output}/ig;
}

Next, try offloading more work onto your database. When I'm using mysql for this sort of work, I offload as many simple tasks as I can to the database because these types of string functions are MUCH faster there. I use a lot of LOWER(), CONCAT(), CONCAT_WS(), and REPLACE(), which may also serve you here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.