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I'm building an API method that takes in, among other things, a dictionary and attempts to insert the data into the database. The data essentially is split out in a parent/child type relationship that is enforced via foreign keys. The database structure is designed this way for specific reasons and cannot change.

I originally wrote this using Entity Framework, but performance testing revealed it was far too slow with large requests due to all of the querying and processing required. Sending all of the data to the database and allowing it to figure out which records should be inserted was much, much faster (we're talking 20-30 minutes down to 20-30 seconds).

Here's my problem: Originally, I was simply returning the number of records that were inserted with ExecuteNonQuery. Easy, right? Now, I need to be able to find out which parent records had a child record successfully inserted. So, I've been trying to refactor this to facilitate it.

For clarity, I'm not interested in which parent records were inserted - I'm only interested in which parent records had a new child record inserted referencing said parent. This way, I can inform the API caller which records were not inserted successfully by comparing with what the caller passed to the API. The best way I can see so far is to use the OUTPUT clause in the child INSERT query to get the ParentIDs that were inserted and store them in a table variable. Then I can just look up the IDs against the parent table and get the names for my comparison. But that necessitates using a reader, and since multiple SQL statements are involved, bad things are happening.

The code as currently presented results in the following exceptions:

The transaction operation cannot be performed because there are pending requests working on this transaction. This SqlTransaction has completed; it is no longer usable. Test method My.Long.Project.Name.UnitTest.UnitTestMethod threw exception: System.InvalidOperationException: This SqlTransaction has completed; it is no longer usable.

While fixing these exceptions is valuable, I'm not as interested in solving them as I am in solving the actual problem. If there's a different path I can take that is extremely fast and provides the output I need, then I'll investigate it. Here's my code. I'm hoping that what I intend to do is clear and any help/guidance/suggestions would be appreciated.

using (Context dbContext = createDbInstance())
{
    //Not happy about setting MultipleActiveResultSets
    string conn = dbContext.Database.Connection.ConnectionString + ";MultipleActiveResultSets=True";

    SqlCommand newInsertCmd = new SqlCommand {Connection = new SqlConnection(conn)};

    //Set up input variables here, including a TPV

    SqlDataReader reader;
    List<string> results = new List<string>();

    newInsertCmd.Connection.Open();
    SqlTransaction sqlTran = newInsertCmd.Connection.BeginTransaction();
    newInsertCmd.Transaction = sqlTran;

    try
    {
        //The two insert statements work just fine. The other junk here (including the OUTPUT clause) is brand new
        const string qryInsertTrans =
            @"INSERT INTO Parent ([Name], [CreateDate])
            SELECT n.Name, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
            FROM
                @NewRecords n
                LEFT JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
            WHERE
                p.ParentID IS NULL;

            DECLARE @OutputVar table(
                ParentID bigint NOT NULL
            );

            INSERT INTO Child ([ParentID], [SomeText], [CreateDate])
            OUTPUT INSERTED.ParentID INTO @OutputVar
            SELECT p.ParentID, n.Text, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
            FROM
                @NewRecords n
                INNER JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                LEFT JOIN Child c ON p.ParentID = c.ParentID AND c.SomeCol = @SomeVal
            WHERE
                c.ChildID IS NULL;

            SELECT p.Name
            FROM Parent p INNER JOIN @OutputVar o ON p.ParentID = o.ParentID";

        newInsertCmd.CommandText = qryInsertTrans;
        reader = await newInsertCmd.ExecuteReaderAsync();

        while (reader.Read())
        {
            results.Add(reader["Name"].ToString());
        }

        sqlTran.Commit();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message);

        try
        {
            sqlTran.Rollback();
        }
        catch (Exception exRollback)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(exRollback.Message);
            throw;
        }

        throw;
    }
    finally
    {
        newInsertCmd.Connection.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, I might well be, but isn't the use of transactions only when you're sending multiple queries? In other words, if you had this split out into several SqlCommands? I was under the impression that a single SqlCommand effectively acts as a transaction in and of itself and that SQL would roll back anything if execution of the command failed mid-way. –  Matthew Haugen Jul 4 '14 at 1:56
    
@MatthewHaugen: A few of things - 1) You may be right (I haven't read anything yet that says you're wrong). 2) The INSERT statements were originally separated into two different commands using the same connection. 3) I was told to use them by someone in my office who is paid more than I am (but I can change anything if I can defend the change). –  Ellesedil Jul 4 '14 at 2:01
1  
Fair enough. Alright. Yeah, I'm not sure. They certainly shouldn't be hurting, but it might be a valuable debugging step to remove the transaction aspect. If nothing else, that might narrow down the issue. –  Matthew Haugen Jul 4 '14 at 2:06
    
@MatthewHaugen: That was a solid idea. I have a unit test that attempts to insert records that already exist. The controller will send the records that exist to the output window in VS. Low and behold, removing the transaction code results in a successful run with the expected results. Having said that, I'll need to look into this a bit more to understand why it was causing issues and if I'm still protected if something goes wrong in the database. –  Ellesedil Jul 4 '14 at 2:24
1  
It sounds like @srutzky has a better grasp of the issue than I, but I'm glad the three of us could at least get you to the stage of it working. It mightn't be a bad idea for you to add in some using blocks just to make sure everything is getting disposed appropriately. I'm not in an IDE right now to say specifics, but I know most of the data-related classes do implement IDisposable. It's one of those magic fixes that doesn't necessarily make much sense, but it might clear some things up. Particularly since it sounds like your error is complaining about something not getting disposed. –  Matthew Haugen Jul 4 '14 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Wait, I just looked over it again and it all makes perfect sense! I don't know if these few days have left me delirious or wise (is there even a difference?) but I'm virtually positive that adding usings will do the trick.

Here's the code, granted I of course haven't tested or even compiled this so I might be off on a few details:

using (Context dbContext = createDbInstance())
{
    //Not happy about setting MultipleActiveResultSets
    string conn = dbContext.Database.Connection.ConnectionString + ";MultipleActiveResultSets=True";

    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(conn))
    using (var newInsertCmd = new SqlCommand(connection))
    {
        newInsertCmd.Connection.Open();
    //Set up input variables here, including a TPV

    List<string> results = new List<string>();

    using(SqlTransaction sqlTran = newInsertCmd.Connection.BeginTransaction())
    {
        newInsertCmd.Transaction = sqlTran;

        try
        {
            //The two insert statements work just fine. The other junk here (including the OUTPUT clause) is brand new
            const string qryInsertTrans =
                @"INSERT INTO Parent ([Name], [CreateDate])
                SELECT n.Name, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
                FROM
                    @NewRecords n
                    LEFT JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                WHERE
                    p.ParentID IS NULL;

                DECLARE @OutputVar table(
                    ParentID bigint NOT NULL
                );

                INSERT INTO Child ([ParentID], [SomeText], [CreateDate])
                OUTPUT INSERTED.ParentID INTO @OutputVar
                SELECT p.ParentID, n.Text, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
                FROM
                    @NewRecords n
                INNER JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                LEFT JOIN Child c ON p.ParentID = c.ParentID AND c.SomeCol = @SomeVal
                WHERE
                     c.ChildID IS NULL;

                SELECT p.Name
                FROM Parent p INNER JOIN @OutputVar o ON p.ParentID = o.ParentID";

            newInsertCmd.CommandText = qryInsertTrans;
            using(var reader = await newInsertCmd.ExecuteReaderAsync())
            {
                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    results.Add(reader["Name"].ToString());
                }
            }
            sqlTran.Commit();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message);

            try
            {
                sqlTran.Rollback();
            }
            catch (Exception exRollback)
            {
                Debug.WriteLine(exRollback.Message);
                throw;
            }

            throw;
        }
    }
}

Or if you're looking for something that's a little more, in my opinion at least, readable:

using (Context dbContext = createDbInstance())
{

    List<string> results = new List<string>();

    //Not happy about setting MultipleActiveResultSets
    string conn = dbContext.Database.Connection.ConnectionString + ";MultipleActiveResultSets=True";

    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(conn))
    {
        newInsertCmd.Connection.Open();
        using(SqlTransaction sqlTran = newInsertCmd.Connection.BeginTransaction())
        {
            try
            {
                using (var parentInsert = new SqlCommand(connection))
                {
                    parentInsert .Transaction = sqlTran;

                    //Set up input variables here, including a TPV

                    newInsertCmd.CommandText = 
                            @"INSERT INTO Parent ([Name], [CreateDate])
                            SELECT n.Name, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
                            FROM @NewRecords n
                            LEFT JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                            WHERE p.ParentID IS NULL;";

                    await newInsertCmd.ExecuteNonQueryAsync();
                }

                using (var childInsert = new SqlCommand(connection))
                {
                    childInsert.Transaction = sqlTran;

                    //Set up input variables here, including a TPV

                    newInsertCmd.CommandText = 
                          @"DECLARE @OutputVar table(
                              ParentID bigint NOT NULL
                          );

                          INSERT INTO Child ([ParentID], [SomeText], [CreateDate])
                          OUTPUT INSERTED.ParentID INTO @OutputVar
                          SELECT p.ParentID, n.Text, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
                          FROM NewRecords n
                          INNER JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                          LEFT JOIN Child c ON p.ParentID = c.ParentID AND c.SomeCol = @SomeVal
                          WHERE c.ChildID IS NULL;

                          SELECT p.Name
                          FROM Parent p INNER JOIN @OutputVar o ON p.ParentID = o.ParentID";

                   using(var reader = await childInsert.ExecuteReaderAsync())
                   {
                       while (reader.Read())
                       {
                           results.Add(reader["Name"].ToString());
                       }
                   }
                }
                sqlTran.Commit();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message);

                try
                {
                    sqlTran.Rollback();
                }
                catch (Exception exRollback)
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine(exRollback.Message);
                    throw;
                }

                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}

And for good measure, the embedded option:

using (Context dbContext = createDbInstance())
{
    //Not happy about setting MultipleActiveResultSets
    string conn = dbContext.Database.Connection.ConnectionString + ";MultipleActiveResultSets=True";

    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(conn))
    using (var newInsertCmd = new SqlCommand(connection))
    {
        newInsertCmd.Connection.Open();
        //Set up input variables here, including a TPV

        List<string> results = new List<string>();

        //The two insert statements work just fine. The other junk here (including the OUTPUT clause) is brand new
        const string qryInsertTrans =
            @"BEGIN TRY
                BEGIN TRANSACTION;

                INSERT INTO Parent ([Name], [CreateDate])
                SELECT n.Name, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
                FROM @NewRecords n
                    LEFT JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                WHERE p.ParentID IS NULL;

                DECLARE @OutputVar table(
                ParentID bigint NOT NULL
                );

                INSERT INTO Child ([ParentID], [SomeText], [CreateDate])
                OUTPUT INSERTED.ParentID INTO @OutputVar
                SELECT p.ParentID, n.Text, GETUTCDATE() [CreateDate]
                FROM @NewRecords n
                    INNER JOIN Parent p ON n.Name = p.Name
                LEFT JOIN Child c ON p.ParentID = c.ParentID AND c.SomeCol = @SomeVal
                WHERE c.ChildID IS NULL;

                SELECT p.Name
                FROM Parent p INNER JOIN @OutputVar o ON p.ParentID = o.ParentID

                COMMIT TRAN;                          
            END TRY
            BEGIN CATCH
            ROLLBACK TRAN;
            THROW;
            END CATCH;";

        newInsertCmd.CommandText = qryInsertTrans;
        using(var reader = await newInsertCmd.ExecuteReaderAsync())
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                results.Add(reader["Name"].ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I ended up settling on just wrapping reader in a using statement. That actually handles the disposal quite nicely, then the commit can fire. Everything else is still pretty much the same. I did this instead of handling the transactions in the SQL itself so that I can engage our logging process for any issues that occur during the transaction. –  Ellesedil Jul 10 '14 at 16:37

The

The transaction operation cannot be performed because there are
pending requests working on this transaction. This SqlTransaction
has completed; it is no longer usable.

error is quite possibly due to the ExecuteReaderAsync and the await. Try a regular ExecuteReader and no await. This should allow the .Net-initiated transaction to work.

If that doesn't fix it, it could be that you are not calling reader.Close(); in your finally block (and this really should be done to not have that orphaned resource). And actually, looking at the error message again, it could be that the reader.Close(); is needed just after the while but before the sqlTran.Commit();.

However, since you have a single SqlCommand call there really is no need for a .Net-initiated transaction, right? This could all be handled cleanly in the SQL by structuring it as follows:

BEGIN TRY
  BEGIN TRANSACTION;

  <your code>

  COMMIT TRAN;
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
  ROLLBACK TRAN;
  THROW;
END CATCH;

If the first INSERT (into Parent) fails, then the second INSERT (into Child) will be skipped as control will immediately pass to the CATCH block.

EDIT:
I just came across the following in the MSDN documentation for the IDataReader interface that supports my contention that the open SqlDataReader is the culprit and that it needs to be closed before the Commit can be issued. In the "Remarks" section of the Read() method, it says:

While the data reader is in use, the associated connection is busy serving the IDataReader. This is the case until Close is called.

This should explain why "a prior attempt that did close the DataReader did not solve the problem" (paraphrase of statement made in a comment on the question) because most likely you were closing it in the finally clause which is too late given that the transaction is committed at the end of the try block.

share|improve this answer
    
I will definitely check that out. That makes sense to me. –  Ellesedil Jul 8 '14 at 4:04
    
Your suggestion that it was the reader being left open was correct. However, the best way to take care of that was to wrap the reader with a using statement. Trying to close the reader, if it were open, in the catch statement was a problem, so using was the best option. –  Ellesedil Jul 10 '14 at 16:39
    
@Ellesedil: closing the reader in the catch block should not be a problem; I do that all of the time. You already have the variable declared outside of the try. Perhaps the only issue was that you don't have it defaulted to null as in: SqlDataReader reader = null;. But I never use using statements and always close my resources, though I usually do it in the finally block as that will happen regardless so I only need to have it once in the code (unless there is a specific order of events issue that makes that not work, but that is rare). Either way, glad I could help. –  srutzky Jul 10 '14 at 18:11

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