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So the dynamic proxy is created, but I can't figure out what I've done wrong to prevent navigation properties from lazy loading. Here is the exact code I've run to test the issue.

DbContext:

public class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
    public MyDbContext()
        : base("MyConnection")
    {
    }

    public DbSet<One> Ones { get; set; }

    public DbSet<Many> Manies { get; set; }
}

Classes:

public class One
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Many> Manies { get; set; }

    public One()
    {
        Manies = new List<Many>();
    }
}

public class Many
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Value { get; set; }

    public int OneId { get; set; }

    public virtual One One { get; set; }

    public Many()
    {
    }
}

Test:

    [TestMethod]
    public void OneToManyTest()
    {
        One parent1 = new One();
        parent1.Manies.Add(new Many() { Value = "child 1" });
        parent1.Manies.Add(new Many() { Value = "child 2" });

        using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
        {
            db.Ones.Add(parent1);
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
        Assert.IsTrue(parent1.Id > 0, "Id not set");

        One parent2;
        using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
        {
            db.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = true;
            db.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
            parent2 = db.Ones.Find(parent1.Id);//parent2 is a dynamic proxy
        }

        Assert.AreEqual(parent1.Id, parent2.Id);
        /*parent2.Manies is null*/
        Assert.AreEqual(parent1.Manies.Count, parent2.Manies.Count);//fails
    }

Database:

enter image description here

I've verified the correct information is being inserted in the database. The relationships look good. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.

Update

This works:

using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
    db.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = true;
    db.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
    parent2 = db.Ones.Find(parent1.Id);//parent2 is a dynamic proxy
    Assert.AreEqual(parent1.Id, parent2.Id);
    Assert.AreEqual(parent1.Manies.Count, parent2.Manies.Count);
}

This doesn't:

using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
    db.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = true;
    db.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
    parent2 = db.Ones.Find(parent1.Id);//parent2 is a dynamic proxy
}
using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
    Assert.AreEqual(parent1.Id, parent2.Id);
    Assert.AreEqual(parent1.Manies.Count, parent2.Manies.Count);//parent2.Manies is null
}

So the same db context is required for built in lazy loading.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To trigger lazy loading you need to access the property in some way, before disposing of the context.

Your test code doesn't acces the property before leaving the context:

    One parent2;
    using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
    {
        db.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = true;
        db.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
        parent2 = db.Ones.Find(parent1.Id);//parent2 is a dynamic proxy
    }
    // Context disposed: thsi would throw an exception:
    var manies = parent2.Manies.ToList()

At this point your context has been disposed. If you tried to access the Manies property you'd get an error stating this.

    One parent2;
    using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
    {
        db.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = true;
        db.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
        parent2 = db.Ones.Find(parent1.Id);//parent2 is a dynamic proxy
        // Context available: this sill lazy load the Manies entities
        var manies = parent2.Manies.ToList(); 
    }

Now, if you check the manies properties, it will be available.

The idea of lazy loading is that, while the context is available, the first time you acces a property wichi wasn't loaded initially, it will be loaded at that moment.

Please, see this article to understand the different ways (eager, lazy, explicit) of loading entities with EF:

Loading Related Entities

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting I had that thought cross my mind. I even attempted that same with a more complicated implementation, so maybe it was something else breaking it. I can't imagine why taking all of the trouble to implement dynamic proxy classes for this that the proxy would be incapable of actual lazy loading outside of a DbContext. Okay I'm off to test it. –  Nathaniel Jul 4 at 13:45
    
So while I had tried this pattern with a more complicated solution apparently this was the solution for my less complicated example. It surprises me that the pattern would be so limited. Under the current implementation I will either have to eager load or risk any other libraries using an object from data access library not knowing they have to provide a DbContext to actually access children. So much for separation of concerns with built in lazy loading. –  Nathaniel Jul 4 at 13:54
    
Dynamic proxies do much more than lazy loading (in fact you can enable proxies and disable lazy loading): track its own changes,andmake relationship fix-up. If you disable proxies EF have to detect changes later usingother techniques. If a dynamic proxy is outside of a DbContext it's natural that it cannot load the data: the context is responsiblefro tracking the changes (how could it track the changes of alazy loaded property outside of acontext?) and it's the owner of the db connection (Would you see it reasonable if EF opened and closed connectionswhenlazy loading)? That's very well thought –  JotaBe Jul 5 at 11:19
    
As far as separation of concerns, or architectural model, EF is absolutely flexible. It depends on the kind of app (desktop, web, WPF) and the kind of architecture you choose you can work with individual repositories, with a context per request (for web apps), with UoW... Don't blame EF: you need to have clear what you want to do, and with EF you can do it. For example with a context per request in a web app or service you can easyly use lazy loading (or a combination of lazy, eager, and explicit loading) without any problems. Think what you want to do and ask a question if you don't know how –  JotaBe Jul 5 at 11:36
    
Thanks for the criticism JotaBe. I appreciate it. I'm glad EF has you to defend it. 'Don't blame the framework' lol. To answer you're earlier question, as a consultant I've worked on almost 10 enterprise solutions that implemented lazy loading prior to EF and everyone of them absolutely creates a new connection when an existing connection is not available. I can reasonably work with the EF implementation, but it is not a standard lazy-load implementation. The EF team must have a very good reason for violating standard practices. –  Nathaniel Jul 6 at 20:53
parent2 = db.Ones.Include(o=>o.Manies).FirstOrDefault(o=>o.Id == parent1.Id);
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't lazy loading using entity framework built in dynamic proxy. This is eager loading. –  Nathaniel Jul 4 at 2:21
1  
If you follow this guide: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd468057.aspx A dynamic proxy is generated. The dynamic proxy is supposed to lazy load the collection. –  Nathaniel Jul 4 at 2:23

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